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Cooltext191153903784651

This guide includes all of the common (and many uncommon) circumstances and situations you might go through as a medicine cat, as well as many herbs and procedures you may need to use. Page created by RyeTheCat.

Cool-Text-191154148070027

Note that most exotic herbs are not listed and will not be used throughout this guide, as most Clans, Packs, Tribes, etc. live in more temperate areas.

Alder Tree Bark

Alder-0

🌱Habitat: Damp, cool wetlands.

🌱Usage:

  • The bark is chewed to ease toothaches.

Alfalfa

Alfalfa

🌱Habitat: Almost anywhere with a mild climate. Sometimes grown by twolegs on large fields.

🌱Usage:

  • The leaves are chewed to prevent tooth decay.

Aloe Vera

Aloe vera

🌱Habitat: Dry, rocky, open areas.

🌱Usages:

  • The cool gel from the aloe vera plant's leaves is applied to skin problems such as burns, skin sores, rashes, etc.
  • The gel is applied soothe the skin.
  • The gel is applied to wounds to speed their healing.
  • The skin from the leaves is used to extract poison. Made into a paste.

Angelica

Angelica

🌱Habitat: Fields, hedgerows, open woodlands, and marshes.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to ease severe coughs.
  • Consumed to clear chest infection.
  • Consumed to treat colds.
  • Consumed by queens to increase the quantity of their milk.

Anise Seeds

Anise

🌱Habitat: Dense, deciduous woodlands.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to ease coughs.
  • Consumed to ease indigestion.
  • Chewed to improve the smell of breath.

Apple Blossoms

Apple blossoms

🌱Habitat: Most temperate climates with plentiful sunlight.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to ease depression.

Arnica Blossoms

Arnica

🌱Habitat: Rocky soil or in open woodlands.

🌱Usages:

  • Applied as an ointment for sprains.
  • Applied as an ointment for sore muscles.
  • Applied as an ointment for bruises.
  • Applied as a poultice to keep inflammation down.

Ash Tree Seeds

Ash seeds

🌱Habitat: Temperate areas with moist soil and direct sunlight (found on the ash tree).

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to fight intestinal pain.

Ash Tree Sprouts

Ash sprouts

🌱Habitat: Temperate areas with moist soil and direct sunlight, usually near mature ash trees.

🌱Usage:

  • Applied to snake or adder bites as a poultice to expel their poison.

Ash Tree Twigs

Twigs

🌱Habitat: Temperate areas with moist soil and direct sunlight (found on the ash tree).

🌱Usage:

  • The twigs are applied to wounds as a paste or poultice, usually alongside burdock root.

Aspen Tree Bark

Aspenbarkk

🌱Habitat: Cooler, yet temperate climates, in deciduous forests.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to relieve stress.
  • Consumed to soothe anxiety.
Basil Leaves
Basil-0
🌱Habitat: Twoleg gardens; hard to find in the wild.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to reduce mucus in diseases such as bronchitis, asthma, or greencough.
  • Consumed to soothe stomach aches.
  • Chewed to treat kittencough.
  • Chewed to treat fever blisters.
  • 2-3 of these leaves are mixed with large quantities of water and consumed to soothe headaches.
  • Mixed with hot water and gargled to to soothe sore throats.
  • Mixed with honey and consumed daily for 6 moons to reduce kidney stones.
  • Applied to clear ringworm.
  • Applied to cure lesions.

Bay Leaves

Bayleaf

🌱Habitat: Anywhere with rich, slightly moist soil and plentiful sunlight (found on the bay tree).

🌱Usage:

  • When applied as a paste, this leaf is one of the best treatments for minor wounds.
  • Good for thorn puncture wounds when applied as a paste.

Beech Leaves

Beech

🌱Habitat: Any soil that isn't waterlogged.

🌱Usage:

  • Used to store and carry other herbs by wrapping them into bundles.

Bee Balm Leaves

Beebalm

🌱Habitat: Sunny, open locations with dry or slightly moist soil. Often found in fields and thickets.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to soothe sore throats.
  • Consumed to cure colds.
  • Consumed to ease fevers.
  • Consumed as an antibiotic for severe diseases.

Belladonna Seeds

Belladonna

🌱Habitat: Damp soils.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to ease cramps and spasms.

Bilberries

Bilberry

🌱Habitat: Cold, sub-arctic climates, grown on shrubs.

🌱Usages:

  • Applied around the eye as a paste to improve eyesight.

Bindweed Stems

Bindweed-0

🌱Habitat: Anywhere with strong, plentiful sunlight and low-moisture soil.

🌱Usage:

  • Wrapped around a broken/dislocated/sprained area to splint it. Use with cobweb.

Birch Tree Bark

Birchbark

🌱Habitat: Cooler, temperate climates (found on the birch tree).

🌱Usage:

  • When applied to broken bones, it speeds their healing.

Birthwort

Birthwort

🌱Habitat: In or near twolegplace, or in damp soil.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed by queens to cause kitting contractions.

🌱Caution: Use only if a queen's kitting is delayed. If consumed too early, the queen's kit(s) will be born premature or stillborn.

Blackberry Leaves

Blackberry

🌱Habitat: In twoleg gardens or in damp soil.

🌱Usage:

  • Applied to bee/wasp stings to reduce inflammation.

Black-eyed Susan

Blackeyedsusan

🌱Habitat: Fields, prairies, open woodlands, and along thunderpaths.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to cure coughs.
  • Consumed to cure colds.
  • Applied as a paste or poultice to clear infection.
  • Applied to lesions as a paste.
  • Consumed for ear infection.

🌱Note: Often used as an additional herb.

Blessed Thistle/Cirsium

Blessedthistle

🌱Habitat: Open areas, along shorelines, and in rocky or sandy soils.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to increase blood circulation throughout the body.

Blueberries

Blueberry

🌱Habitat: Anywhere with plentiful sunlight and rocky or sandy soil.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to aid fevers.
  • Consumed to ease stomach aches.

(Dried) Boneset

Boneset

🌱Habitat: Low, wet ground; along streams, swamps, and in thickets.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to cure colds.
  • Consumed to cure the flu.
  • Consumed to ease indigestion.
  • Consumed to ease constipation.
  • Consumed to ease loss of appetite.

🌱Caution: If boneset is consumed in large amounts, it can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Never consume fresh boneset, as it is toxic and considered poisonous. Always sun-dry boneset thoroughly before consumption. Boneset is usually used as a last-resort herb because you must be very, very careful when using it.

Borage Leaves

Borage

🌱Habitat: In deciduous forests.

🌱Usages:

  • 3 of these leaves are consumed by queens to increase the quality and quantity of their milk.
  • 3 of these leaves are consumed daily by pregnant queens for nutrition.
  • Consumed to aid fevers.

Broom

Broom

🌱Habitat: Dense forests with little sunlight.

🌱Usage:

  • Applied as a poultice to serious injuries, particularly open wounds.

Burdock Root

Burdock

🌱Habitat: Dry areas.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to ease aching joints.
  • Applied as a poultice to treat wounds.
  • Applied as a poultice to treat rat bites.
  • Applied as a paste to treat rashes.

Burnet Leaves

Burnet

🌱Habitat: Dry, grassy soil.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to ease hunger pangs.
  • Consumed to give strength.

🌱Note: Burnet is a traditional traveling herb.

Bramble Twigs

Bramble-0

🌱Habitat: Deciduous forests.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to induce unconsciousness in the recipient. Thinned with water or thickened with honey depending on how long and how deeply the patient needs to be asleep.

Buttonbush

Buttonbush

🌱Habitat: Wetlands such as swamps and marshes.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to ease indigestion.

Calendula Blossoms

Calendula

🌱Habitat: Alongside thunderpaths and in twolegplace.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to treat intestinal problems.
  • Consumed to ease stomach aches.
  • Applied as a poultice to speed up the healing of wounds.
  • Applied as a paste to treat lesions.
  • Applied as a paste to soothe skin sores.
  • Applied as a poultice to inflamed skin to bring down swelling.

Caraway

Caraway

🌱Habitat: Along thunderpaths and in meadows at high altitudes.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to soothe the recipient.
  • Consumed by queens to increase the quantity of their milk.
  • Consumed to aid fevers.
  • Applied to wounds as a paste or poultice.

Catchweed Burrs

Catchweed

🌱Habitat: On hedges in twoleg gardens and in wet or moist areas.

🌱Usage:

  • Applied on top of pastes, poultices, or cobwebs to keep them secured on the patient without hurting the skin.

Catmint/Catnip Leaves

Catmint

🌱Habitat: Twoleg gardens. Hard to find in the wild.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to treat coughs.
  • Consumed to cure whitecough and greencough.
  • Consumed to cure upper respiratory infection.

🌱Note: It is best to collect catmint late in the day, so that the morning dew has burned off. That way, the excess liquid won't make the leaves rot in storage.

Cayenne Peppers

Cayenne-0

🌱Habitat: Twoleg gardens.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to reduce the chances and weaken the effects of a heart attack.
  • Consumed to strengthen the heart after the recipient has accidentally swallowed foxglove seeds.

🌱Caution: This pepper is extremely spicy. It is recommended to sweeten it with heather nectar before consumption. It is not recommended to allow a patient to consume this pepper if they are suffering from a stomach ache.

Celandine

Celandine

🌱Habitat: Close to rivers and in dense, deciduous forests.

🌱Usage:

  • The juice from the leaves is trickled into weak eyes to strengthen them.

Chamomile Petals

Chamomile
🌱Habitat: Grassy areas and in twoleg gardens.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to strengthen the heart.
  • Consumed to soothe the mind.

🌱Note: Chamomile is a traditional traveling herb.

Chervil

Chervil

🌱Habitat: Dense, deciduous forests, or in the crevices of rocks.

🌱Usages:

  • The roots are consumed to ease stomach aches.
  • The leaves are applied to infected wounds as a poultice.

Chickweed

Chickweed
🌱Habitat: Deciduous forests, pastures, and twoleg gardens.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to cure coughs.
  • Consumed as a substitute for catmint, much like hawkweed.

Chicory

Chicory
🌱Habitat: In twolegplace, along thunderpaths, and in fields.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to energize the recipient.
  • Consumed to build up the recipient's appetite.
  • Consumed to ease indigestion.

Chives

Chives
🌱Habitat: Rocky pastures and damp meadows.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to build up physical strength.
  • Applied as a poultice to wounds.
  • Applied as a poultice to lesions.
  • Applied to stall bleeding.

Cilantro

Cilantro

🌱Habitat: In fields and along rivers in cool places, also grows in twoleg gardens.

🌱Usages:

  • Applied to assorted wounds to keep out infection.
  • Good for minor wounds when applied.
  • If resources are limited, can be used to ease pain.

Cob Nuts/Hazelnuts

Cobnuts
🌱Habitat: Rich, moist soils in sunny or partially sunny areas; alongside streams, meadows, thunderpaths, and woodland edges (found on the hazel tree).

🌱Usage:

  • Made into ointments and applied to cracked or sore pads.

Cobweb/Spider Web

Cobwebb

🌱Habitat: Anywhere that web-spinning arachnids are present.

🌱Usages:

  • Pressed onto wounds to help stall, stop, or clot bleeding.
  • Applied to wounds as a bandage.
  • Wrapped around broken/dislocated bones or sprains to splint them. Use with bindweed or rush.

Coltsfoot Leaves

Coltsfoot
🌱Habitat: Wetlands.

🌱Usages:

  • Applied as a poultice to cracked or sore pads.
  • Consumed to ease breathing.
  • Consumed in small amounts to treat minor cases of kittencough.

Comfrey Root

Comfrey

🌱Habitat: Grassy fields with damp soil.

🌱Usages:

  • Applied to broken bones to speed their healing.
  • Applied to soothe wounds.
  • Applied to wrenched claws.
  • Applied to itching or irritated skin.
  • Applied to stiff or aching joints.
  • Woven into the patient's nest to ease sore muscles.

Coptis

Coptis

🌱Habitat: Boggy wetlands in northern, temperate areas.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to deteriorate and soothe toothaches.
  • Applied to inflamed skin to bring down swelling.

Cranberries

Cranberry

🌱Habitat: Wetlands such as bogs and marshes.

🌱Usage:

  • Applied to wounds generously.

Daisy Leaves

Daisy-0

🌱Habitat: Damp meadows and fields.

🌱Usages:

  • Applied to aching/stiff joints.
  • Applied to sprains.

🌱Note: Daisy is a traditional traveling herb, used to prepare the joints for walking for long periods of time.

Dandelion Stems

Dandelion

🌱Habitat: Almost anywhere open.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to ease pain.
  • Applied to bee stings to reduce pain and swelling.

Daylily

Daylily

🌱Habitat: Abandoned twoleg nests, open grasslands, wetlands, and moist woodlands.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to ease coughs.
  • Consumed to cure colds.
  • Applied to infections.
  • Applied to lesions.

🌱Note: Often used as an additional herb as it isn't very strong by itself.

Dill

Dill

🌱Habitat: Twoleg gardens.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to deteriorate painful gas.
  • Consumed to soothe heartburn.

Dock Leaves

Dock.pnh

🌱Habitat: Dense, deciduous forests and marshes.

🌱Usages:

  • Applied as a poultice to soothe/speed up the healing of scratches.
  • Applied as a paste to soothe cracked or sore pads.

Echinacea

Echinacea

🌱Habitat: Moist soil, not far from other brightly colored flowers.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to induce regular breathing.
  • Applied as a poultice to clear infection.
Elder Leaves
Elder-1
🌱Habitat: Anywhere with a slightly damp atmosphere, partial sunlight, and rich soil.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to cure blackcough/redcough.
  • Applied as a paste to soothe sprains.

Eucalyptus Leaves

Eucalyptus

🌱Habitat: Hot, dry deserts with plentiful sunlight.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to ease pain.
  • Consumed to calm the mind.

🌱Caution: An overdose can easily cause a stomach ache.

Eyebright

Eyebright

🌱Habitat: Meadows at a high altitude, where snow is common.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to ease sneezing.
  • Consumed to soothe watery eyes.
  • Consumed to soothe irritated throats.

Fennel Seeds

Fennel seeds

🌱Habitat: Dry soil close to water.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to ease stomach aches.
  • Consumed to ease indigestion.
  • Consumed to deteriorate congestion.
  • Consumed to ease coughs.

Fennel Stalks

Fennel

🌱Habitat: Dry soil close to water.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to ease pain in the hips.

Feverfew

Feverfew

🌱Habitat: Close to or along riverbanks, streams, brooks, etc.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to lower body temperature in fevers and chills.
  • Consumed to ease headaches.

(Wild) Garlic

Wild garlic

🌱Habitat: Deciduous forests.

🌱Usage:

  • A patch of wild garlic can be rolled around in to prevent infection. It can also be applied.

Ginger Root

Ginger

🌱Habitat: Dry, sandy soil.

🌱Usages:

  • The root's juices are chewed and consumed to treat asthma.
  • Consumed to ease coughs.
  • Consumed to soothe nausea.

Goatweed

Goatweed

🌱Habitat: Almost anywhere with a temperate climate.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to ease grief.

Goldenrod

Goldenrod

🌱Habitat: Open fields and moors.

🌱Usage:

  • Applied to wounds as a poultice.

Goosegrass

Goosegrass

🌱Habitat: Large, open moors and fields.

🌱Usage:

  • Woven into cobweb to aid the stoppage of bleeding.

Gotu Kola

Gotu kola

🌱Habitat: Damp soil.

🌱Usages:

  • Mixed with warm water and consumed to allow one to think with clarity.
  • Consumed to soothe depression.
  • Applied as a poultice to reduce scar damage.

Gumweed

Gumweed

🌱Habitat: Prairies, in twolegplace, and along thunderpaths.

🌱Usage:

  • Applied as a paste or poultice to quicken the sealing of wounds.

Hawkweed

Hawkweed

🌱Habitat: Open, dry forests.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to ease coughs.
  • Consumed as a substitute for catmint, although catmint is preferred.

Hawthorn Berries

Hawthorn

🌱Habitat: Open places, woodlands, hedgerows, and and rocky areas.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to ease indigestion, particularly when the patient has consumed unnecessary contents (i.e. poison).

Heather

Heather

🌱Habitat: Sandy soils, particularly in open places.

🌱Usage:

  • Mixed with water and consumed by kits to ease indigestion.
  • The nectar is consumed to sweeten other herbs without making them lose their healing properties.
  • The nectar is consumed to make swallowing easier.

Honey

Honeycomb

🌱Habitat: In beehives.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to soothe sore throats.
  • Consumed to ease the effects of smoke inhalation.
  • Consumed to sweeten other herbs without making them lose their effects.
  • Consumed as an energizer.
  • Applied to infected wounds.
  • Applied to the skin to treat skin problems.
  • Applied to the skin alongside poultices and pastes to help them stay on the patient.

Hops

Hops

🌱Habitat: Along rivers and at the edges of forests.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to calm nervousness.
  • Consumed to ease anxiety.

Horsetail

Horsetail

🌱Habitat: Marshy areas.

🌱Usages:

  • Applied as a poultice to clear infection from a wound.
  • Applied as a poultice to stop bleeding.

Huckleberries

Huckleberries

🌱Habitat: Cold places at semi-high elevations.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to ease muscle pain.

(Crushed) Iris Petals

Iris-0

🌱Habitats:

  • In/around water in sandy soils.
  • Twoleg gardens.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed by queens to stimulate their breathing during kitting.
  • Consumed to aid the sore throat of a kit. Can be mixed with water.

Ivy Leaves

Ivy-1

🌱Habitat: Places with dense vegetation.

🌱Usage:

  • Used to store/carry other herbs, historically used by ShadowClan medicine cats.

Jasmine

Jasmine

🌱Habitat: Twolegplace.

🌱Usages:

  • Roots, leaves, and petals are used to stop adder/snake venom from spreading to the internal system when applied generously to the bite.
  • Made into a paste with rose petals to extract venom from adder/snake bites.

Juniper Berries

JUniper

🌱Habitat: Dry areas.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to soothe nerves.
  • Consumed to ease stomach aches.
  • Consumed to help stimulate breathing.
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Lavender Petals

Lavender-0

🌱Habitat: Twoleg gardens and in sandy or rocky soil.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed/woven into the patient's nest to induce unconsciousness.
  • Consumed to soothe nerves.
  • Consumed to bring down fevers.

Lotus Root

Lotus

🌱Habitat: On the water in places with sunny, warm conditions.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to energize the recipient.
  • Made into a paste and spread on the tongue to awaken the recipient.

Magnolia Leaves

Magnolia-0

🌱Habitat: Temperate woodlands populated with both deciduous and coniferous trees.

🌱Usage:

  • These large, sustainable leaves are used to store and carry other herbs, as well as hold liquids such as honey or water when making poultices and tinctures.

Mallow Leaves

Mallow

🌱Habitat: Near shores.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to prevent infection.
  • Consumed to ease stomach aches.
  • Applied to soothe bee stings.

🌱Note: Mallow leaves are best collected at sunhigh, when the morning dew has burned off so that they don't rot in the store.

Maple Tree Bark

Maple bark

🌱Habitat: Deciduous forests in a variety of climates.

🌱Usage:

  • Spread on the tongue to awaken the recipient.

Marigold

Wildmarigold

🌱Habitat: Near water.

🌱Usages:

  • Applied to wounds.
  • Applied to clear infection.

Milk Thistle

Milk thistle

🌱Habitat: Rocky areas and in the mountains.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed by queens to aid a poor milk supply, especially during the moons of leaf-bare.

Milkweed

Milkweed

🌱Habitat: In fields, meadows, and along thunderpaths.

🌱Usages:

  • Applied to the skin to treat rashes and burns.

🌱Caution: Do not consume milkweed or place around the eyes, for it is poisonous upon entering the body.

Mint Leaves

Mint

🌱Habitat: In huge, deciduous forests and in twoleg gardens.

🌱Usages:

  • Spread on a dead cat's pelt to hide death-scent.
  • Spread on the recipient's tongue to induce consciousness.
  • Consumed to loosen congestion.
  • Consumed to relieve nasal passages.

Moss

Moss-0

🌱Habitat: On old or dead trees, rocks, or logs in damp, shady areas.

🌱Usages:

  • Can be used for bedding.
  • Dampened to sterilize wounds.
  • Temporarily packed inside wounds while another is being worked on.
  • Dampened to ease pain/give relief.
  • Dampened to ease swelling.
  • Drenched in water and brought to cats incapable or too weak to reach a water source to drink from.
  • Can be used as a sort of sponge.

Mouse Bile

Mouse bile

🌱Habitat: Lines a few of the mouse's organs.

🌱Usage:

  • The only known remedy to fully eliminate ticks and fleas. It is extracted from the mouse and stored in dry moss until use.

Mud

Mud-0

🌱Habitat: Anywhere it has recently rained, in wetlands, or at the bottom of a stream, river, or lake.

🌱Usages:

  • Applied to a bee sting to reduce swelling and pain.
  • Applied to the recipient's skin to cool them off.

🌱Caution: Do not apply to or around wounds as it increases the risk of infection.

Narcissus Leaves

Narcissus

🌱Habitat: Wetlands, woodlands, fields, rocky areas, and along rivers.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed by queens during kitting to ease pain.

(Dried) Oak Tree Leaves

Dried oak leaves

🌱Habitat: On the floor of deciduous forests in leaf-fall, usually near oak trees.

🌱Usage:

  • Applied as a poultice to clear infection.

Oak Tree Sap

Oak sap

🌱Habitat: Deciduous forests.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to weaken blackcough.
  • Applied to clear infection.
Olive Leaves
Olive-0
🌱Habitat: Warm, dry areas.

🌱Usage:

  • Applied to aid severe wounds and poisons.

Oregano

Oregano

🌱Habitat: Dry, grassy areas.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to ease stomach aches.

Parsley

Parsley

🌱Habitat: Moist, yet well-drained soil with plentiful sunlight.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to ease stomach aches.
  • Consumed by queens to dry up their milk or conserve it for later, especially during leaf-bare when food is scarce.

Pawpaw Fruit

Pawpaw

🌱Habitat: Open places.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed by kits to cure kittencough.

Peach Leaves

Peach-0

🌱Habitat: Anywhere with fertile, moist soil and plentiful sunlight.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to ease nausea.

Peppermint Leaves

Peppermint

🌱Habitat: Anywhere with moist, well-drained soil.

🌱Usage:

  • Chewed for bad breath.

Poppy Milk/Residue

Poppy milk

🌱Habitat: Fields and deciduous forests.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to ease pain, particularly headaches.

Poppy Seeds

Poppy seeds

🌱Habitat: Fields and deciduous forests.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to ease pain.
  • Consumed to induce unconsciousness.
  • Made into a paste to extract minor poisons from wounds, such as spider bites and bad infections.

🌱Caution: Not to be consumed by kits or nursing queens. The effect is too strong on kits, and could affect the queens' milk.

Ragweed Leaves

Ragweed

🌱Habitat: Prairies and in the mountains.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed for additional strength.

🌱Caution: Many cats are allergic to ragweed. This herb is not recommended as a first choice.

Ragwort Leaves

Ragwort leaves

🌱Habitat: Almost anywhere, particularly in areas with frequent rainfall and cool temperatures.

🌱Usage:

  • Made into a poultice and covered in juniper berry juice to soothe aching joints.

🌱Caution: Do not consume ragweed, as it is highly poisonous and often gets farm animals sick.

Raspberry Leaves

Raspberry

🌱Habitat: Fertile soils.

🌱Usages:

  • Made into a paste and laced with violet mist to treat minor wounds.
  • Consumed by queens during kitting to ease pain.

(Wild) Rose

Wild rose

🌱Habitat: Clearings, open woodlands, and rocky slopes.

🌱Usages:

  • The petals and thorns can be chewed into a paste and applied to help seal wounds.
  • The petals can be made into a paste alongside jasmine roots/leaves/petals to extract the venom from adder/snake bites.

Rosemary Blossoms

Rosemary blossoms

🌱Habitat: Deciduous forests.

🌱Usages:

  • Spread on a dead cat's pelt to hide death-scent.
  • Crushed and applied around the eyes to aid eye pains/infection.

Rosewood

Rosewood

🌱Habitat: Rich soils in wet woodlands.

🌱Usages:

  • Applied to adder/snake bites to extract their venom.

Rosinweed

Rosinweed

🌱Habitat: Grassy fields consisting largely of weeds.

🌱Usages:

  • The leaves are consumed alongside water to stop poison from circulating in the internal system.

Rush Stalks

Rush

🌱Habitat: Soils with low fertility in assorted moist conditions.

🌱Usage:

  • Used to bind broken/dislocated/sprained limbs. Use with cobweb.

Saffron

Saffron

🌱Habitat: Thick soil consisting of clay.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to induce unconsciousness.

Sage Root

Sage-0

🌱Habitat: Sandy soils and twoleg gardens.

🌱Usages:

  • Crushed, mixed with water, and consumed to aid the recollection of memory.
  • Consumed as an antibiotic.
  • Made into a poultice and spread on the recipient's pelt to reduce dandruff.
  • Applied to cracked or sore pads as an ointment.

Saw Palmetto

Saw palmetto

🌱Habitat: Along coastlines and in oak-pine woodlands.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to treat unique illnesses.

Shock Root

Shock root

🌱Habitat: Damp soils.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to help reboot the nervous system after the recipient has fainted or consumed poison.

Skullcap Seeds

Skullcap

🌱Habitat: Grassy fields with dry soil.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to give excess strength.

Snakeroot

Snakeroot

🌱Habitat: Warm climates.

🌱Usages:

  • Applied to the bite of a snake to extract its venom.
  • Applied to clear infection.

Snapdragon Seeds

Snapdragon

🌱Habitat: Fertile soil with plentiful sunlight.

🌱Usage:

  • Cures ringworm when applied to the designated area.

Sorrel

Sorrel

🌱Habitat: Near twoleg settlements.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to ease hunger pangs.

🌱Note: Sorrel is a traditional traveling herb.

Sticks/Twigs

Twigs-0

🌱Habitat: Near trees.

🌱Usages:

  • Used to bind broken/dislocated/sprained limbs. Use with cobweb.
  • Bitten down on by patients in pain, especially kitting queens and cats with severe wounds.

Stinging Nettle

Stinging nettle

🌱Habitat: Deciduous forests.

🌱Usages:

  • The seeds are consumed to fight minor poisons such as spider bites and bad infections. They make the recipient vomit.
  • The leaves are applied to bring down swelling.
  • The leaves are applied to speed up the healing of wounds.
  • The stems can be chewed to fight infection.

Strawberries

Strawberries

🌱Habitat: Fields, riverbanks, forest margins, rocky outcrops, and twoleg gardens.

🌱Usages:

  • The only herb that can completely cure blackcough. It is consumed.

Sunflower Seeds

Sunflower

🌱Habitat: Twoleg gardens and prairies.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to ease pulmonary problems and conditions.
  • Consumed to cure bronchitis.

Sweet Sedge Sap

Sweet sedge

🌱Habitat: Close to rivers and other wetlands.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to ease infection.

Sweet Wood Root

Sweet wood

🌱Habitat: Open places with dry or slightly damp soil.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to remove toxins such as poison or venom.
  • Added to other herbal mixtures to increase their effectiveness.

Tansy

Tansy

🌱Habitat: Deciduous forests and near twolegplaces.

🌱Usage:

  • One of the most widely used remedies for coughs. It is consumed in small doses.
  • Can soothe sore throats if consumed in small doses.

Thyme

Thyme

🌱Habitat: Hot locations with plentiful sunlight.

🌱Usage:

  • Chewed to calm the recipient.

Tormentil Root/Petals

Tormentil

🌱Habitat: Most cool climates and twoleg gardens.

🌱Usages:

  • Applied to treat a variety of wounds.
  • Applied to treat a variety of poisons.
  • Applied to aid the stoppage of bleeding.

Turmeric

Turmeric

🌱Habitat: Twoleg gardens.

🌱Usage:

  • The root is consumed to ease pain.

Valerian Root

Valerian root

🌱Habitat: Fields, river banks, stream banks, broad-leaved forests, near abandoned twoleg nests, and forest margins.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to reduce fever, chills, and thirst.

Violet Mist

Violet mist

🌱Habitat: Prairies, open woodland, forest margins, savannas, twolegplace, and twoleg gardens.

🌱Usage:

  • Applied to prevent infection.

🌱Note: Violet mist is made by finely crushing petals of the violet blossom.

Watercress

Watercress

🌱Habitat: Shallow, running water.

🌱Usages:

  • Applied to soothe irritated skin.
  • Applied to treat lesions.

Watermint

Watermint

🌱Habitat: In streams or damp soils.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to ease stomach aches.

Water Violet

Water violet

🌱Habitat: Ponds and ditches.

🌱Usages:

  • Applied to severe wounds as a poultice.
  • Applied to infected wounds to clear infection.

Willow Tree Bark

Willow tree bark

🌱Habitat: Close to ponds, rivers, lakes, etc; near twolegplaces (found on the willow tree).

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to ease aches, headaches in particular.

Willow Tree Leaves

Willow tree leaves

🌱Habitat: Close to ponds, rivers, lakes, etc; near twolegplaces (found on the willow tree).

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to stop vomiting.

Willow Tree Sap

Willow tree sap

🌱Habitat: Close to ponds, rivers, lakes, etc; near twolegplaces (found beneath the bark of the willow tree).

🌱Usage:

  • Trickled into the eyes to clear blurry vision.

Windflower Sprouts

Windflower

🌱Habitat: Rocky soils.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed by queens during pregnancy to ease the pain of cramps.
  • Consumed by queens during kitting to ease the pain of contractions.

Wintergreen

Wintergreen

🌱Habitat: Oak-pine woods, sandy soils, and at high altitudes.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to expel poison.
  • Made into pastes and poultices for wounds.

Witch Hazel

Witch hazel

🌱Habitat: Dense, deciduous forests with dry soil.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed as an energizer.
  • Chewed to soothe toothaches.
  • Applied to ease sores, bruises, and insect bites.
  • Applied to stop bleeding.

Yarrow

Yarrow-0

🌱Habitat: In the crevices of rocks and in rocky soil.

🌱Usages:

  • Consumed to induce vomiting.
  • Made into ointments for cracked or sore pads.

Yerba Santa

Yerba santa

🌱Habitat: Dense forests close to the ocean.

🌱Usage:

  • Consumed to level the amount of mucus production in the lungs.
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(Fresh) Boneset
Boneset

🌱Habitat: Low, wet ground, along streams, swamps, and in thickets.

🌱Caution: Consuming fresh boneset with cause you to become nauseous and weak, will make you vomit, and will possibly cause seizures. If large amounts are consumed, it has the ability to kill. However, thoroughly dried boneset is perfectly fine to consume and can be used as a healing herb (see Healing Herbs: (Dried) Boneset).

Deathberries/Yew Berries/Night-Seeds

Deathberries

🌱Habitat: Shady forest ravines.

🌱Caution: This is the deadliest plant known to cats. One berry can instantly kill a young cat, and a few berries have the same effect on a grown one.

Foxglove Seeds

Foxglove

🌱Habitat: Anywhere with a temperate climate.

🌱Caution: Can easily cause paralysis and heart failure. Do not confuse with poppy seeds!

Holly Berries

Holly

🌱Habitat: Deciduous forests.

🌱Caution: While not very dangerous to grown cats, holly berries are still toxic to kits and have the ability to kill them.

Nightshade Berries

Nightshadeberries

🌱Habitat: Shady places with limestone in the soil.

🌱Caution: Can instantly kill a cat if consumed.

Water Hemlock

Waterhemlock

🌱Habitat: Wet, marshy areas.

🌱Caution: Causes pain, foaming at the mouth, and possible seizures. Do not confuse with parsley!

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Conservation

  • Leave more of the plant behind when you collect an herb, trying not to dig up the roots if you don't need to (more of the plant will grow back that way).
  • Occasionally collect the seeds from the plant and scatter them around your territory so that the plant will sprout in other places.
  • Visit each herb patch regularly and clear away any weeds that may be taking up its growing space.
  • Make sure it's getting enough water and sunlight, and check for bug infestations.

Sun-drying Herbs

If an herb is wet, make sure to sun-dry it thoroughly before use. Try not to get them wet in the first place, though, as fresh herbs work more efficiently than dried ones (with exceptions for herbs like boneset and oak leaves).

Storage

  • Always gather fresh herbs when your stock is low, especially during leaf-bare.
  • Throw out old herbs when they have lost their healing properties to make room for new ones.
  • During leaf-fall, stock up on herbs for leaf-bare and sun-dry them so that they will last longer.

Pastes and Poultices

The difference between a paste and a poultice is that a poultice can be made with fresh or dried herbs, and the whole plant is used. Pastes are formed when a liquid version of a certain part of a plant is used. To create a poultice with dried herbs, you must first crush them into a pulp and moisten them with water just enough to make them soft enough to be applied. Making a poultice with fresh herbs requires the same process, but without moistening the pulp. Making a paste is pretty self-explanatory, it only requires a certain herb part to be crushed into a pulp, added to large amounts of water to liquify, and applied. "Spread" is another common name for poultice, and "lather" is another common name for paste.

Mixtures and Syrups

A mixture is any combination of herbs, chewed/crushed or not, that is consumed by the patient. It can also be mixed liquids such as water or honey. A syrup is a type of mixture in which an herb (or combination of herbs) is chewed/crushed and mixed with water. You can thicken it with honey as well.

Tinctures

(First thought of by TornClan)

A tincture is a way to preserve a mixture of herbs more efficiently. When herbs start to wilt, they can be made into tinctures to preserve freshness and last longer. Note that this usually takes time to do. See The Head: Fevers or Emotional Issues: Frayed Nerves for more information on tinctures. When healing with a tincture, unwrap it and dab a damp wad of moss into the mixture. The receiving feline should then lap it up.

Battles

Medicine cats have a very important role during battles- keeping their clanmates alive. That's why they should be sure to prepare for them.

  • Make sure that you know the number of cats participating in the battle, and try to estimate how long the battle will be. Be sure to take along the appropriate amount of herbs, along with a decent amount of extra.
  • Mix together several poultices ahead of time to save time during the battle. Do the same with pastes, poultices, tinctures, and other mixtures if needed.
  • Always take your apprentice with you to help you heal (if you have one), especially if you're the only medicine cat around.
  • If needed, ask some of the apprentices to help you carry supplies to the battlefield.
  • At the site of the battle, try to find a thick bush, a tree hollow, or somewhere out of sight that you can use as a temporary medicine cats' den. Tell the leader, deputy, or whoever is in charge of your cats during battle where it is, but try to keep it a secret from the enemy. Lay down your herbs and quickly sort them out as best as you can. Drag in some moss or dead leaves if possible for injured cats to lay on.
  • If multiple cats come in at a time, treat the most badly injured first, and work your way to the least injured. Your apprentice should follow the same routine when helping.
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These are a few procedures used by medicine cats to treat patients without solely using plants.

Amputation

This idea is from YureiCat's Medicine Cat Guide. Most of what is under this category is not my own, except for some of the wording and a few things that I added to the process, such as the bone's names under Step 5.

🌱Note: Amputation is for last-resort purposes only, and is easy to mess up. Keep in mind that only 20% of cats survive after being amputated.

  1. Position the soon-to-be-amputated limb/tail upright so that the blood drains from the area. You don't want your patient to die from blood loss.
  2. Crush bramble twigs, saffron, and lavender into a mild syrup, thickened with honey.
  3. Feed to the patient.
  4. Wait until their breathing becomes steady and relaxed with unconsciousness.
  5. Break the appropriate bone in the limb/tail you are going to amputate. If you are going to amputate one of the patient's front legs, break the humerus. If you are amputating a hind leg, break the femur. If you are amputating the tail, break the coccygeal vertebrae.
  6. Use a sharp, sterile rock or claw to cut through the necessary muscle ligaments and fascia.
  7. Press slightly cool/warm (depending on the outside temperature), damp moss to the recently amputated stump, expelling any bacteria and soaking up any blood that trickled out.
  8. Once you are confident that the stump has been cleansed thoroughly, apply a paste of violet mist and honey to its flesh walls. Apply a few thick, anti-infectious and wound pastes to the stump as well, such as broom malice, wild garlic, sweet wood root (to enhance the effect), and oak tree sap.
  9. Wrap the stump in goosegrass-enforced cobweb.
  10. Before the patient becomes fully conscious, feed them a dose of willow tree bark or turmeric.
  11. Once the patient becomes fully conscious, feed them a dose of shock root and blessed thistle.

🌱Post-Amputation Tips -

  • Keep an eye on the patient for the next few moons. Change their cobweb and goosegrass covering regularly, along with the pastes. Make sure to thoroughly clean off the old pastes before reapplying new ones. Do this until their stump has fully healed over with skin.
  • The patient will need to rest in your den until their stump has fully healed. At the same time, try taking the patient to wade in the shallows of a slow-running stream, pond, or lake to exercise their body without using too much energy.
  • The patient should consistently drink water to keep fluid in their veins and eat meals of nutritious, fatty prey.

CPR (Heart/Lung Resuscitation)

CPR is used if a cat's heart has stopped or they have stopped breathing. This may occur if the cat was caught in an accident with an twoleg wire (electrical wire), if they have experienced a heart attack, or if they have drowned.

  1. Place your paws in the middle of the patient's chest, level with their sternum.
  2. Start repeatedly pressing on their chest, around 100x/minute.
  3. After you have pressed on the cat's chest approximately 30 times, tilt their head back, cover their nose, and blow air into their mouth.
  4. Repeat steps 2-3 until the patient responds, their chest steadily rising and falling repeatedly.

Enucleation

(First thought of by XxDisneyxX on her Herbs for Medicine Cats page, though she refers to it as "Stitching".)

🌱Note: Enucleation is a risky procedure that involves purposefully injuring your patient. It should be used as a last resort only, for it is very painful for the patient and risks their death.

  1. Have the patient lay on their side or back, depending on where you are planning to perform the enucleation.
  2. Give them a syrup of bramble twigs, saffron, and lavender, thickened with honey.
  3. Wait until the patient's breathing becomes steady and regularly paced, signaling their unconsciousness.
  4. Take a sharp, sterile rock or claw and cut a clean line wherever you're performing the procedure.
  5. Gingerly press warm, damp, sterile moss to the cut to wipe up any blood that trickles out. Use the moss to move the edges of the cut around as well to give yourself space to work. Never use your paws or claws while working in the cat's insides.
  6. Do what you performed the procedure to do. If it's removing unnecessary contents in their stomach, use a dry, sterile, yet still sustainable leaf to retrieve the item. If it's shifting or relocating an organ, use a dry, sterile, sustainable to move/retrieve it.
  7. After you have completed what you needed to, have a third cat gingerly hold the two ends of the flesh together with their teeth.
  8. (Optional, depending on the size of the laceration) Perform either steps 7-8 of the second technique under Wounds: Severe Wounds or steps 3-6 of the third technique.
  9. Lather the flesh walls with violet mist, and spread a paste of broom malice and oak tree sap onto the stitching.
  10. Dab warm, damp, sterile moss onto the cut every few hours.
  11. Before the patient becomes fully conscious, give them a decent dose of willow bark and chamomile.
  12. When the patient awakens, give them a dose of shock root. Place goosegrass-enforced cobweb over the cut if you didn't cauterize it (if you did, wrap the cut in goosegrass-enforced cobweb after three days).

🌱Post-Enucleation Tips -

  • Make sure they keep water in their veins and eat meals of nutritious, slightly fatty prey.
  • Keep an eye on the patient for the next few moons. Change their cobweb and goosegrass covering regularly, along with the pastes. Make sure to thoroughly clean off the old pastes before reapplying new ones. Do this until their cut has fully healed.
  • Excuse the patient from warrior/apprentice duties until their cut has fully healed or scabbed (depending on the severity of the cut).
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Bee/Wasp Sting Allergic Reaction

Symptoms

*All cats develop swelling and pain after being stung, but some cats will develop worse symptoms. If the patient experiences any of these symptoms after gaining a bee or wasp sting, they may be allergic to their venom.

  • A larger amount of inflamed skin than what would be normal for the sting
  • Muscle pain around the affected area
  • Vomiting
  • Fatigue
  • Fever
  • Shock
 Swelling Treatment

Apply a poultice of blackberry and nettle leaves to the sting.

Muscle Pain Treatment
  1. Rub a paste of huckleberry and arnica blossoms on the sting.
  2. Have the patient consume sweet wood root, along with lots of water.
Vomiting Treatment
  1. Retrieve a large beech or magnolia leaf to catch the patient's vomit.
  2. Have the patient consume a small dose of willow leaves.
  3. After they have ceased to vomit, give them anise seeds or peppermint leaves to cleanse their mouth (as they may find that their mouth tastes horrible after vomiting) alongside decent amounts of water.
  4. Give them sweet wood root afterward.
Fatigue Treatment

Allow the patient to rest and excuse them from warrior duties for 1-2 days, along with feeding them small doses of sweet wood root twice a day. Make sure they stay hydrated.

Fever Treatment
  • Have the patient consume a fever tincture (if already prepared), which can be found under Fever and Headaches: Fever. Add in a dose of sweet wood root along with lots of water.
  • If you don't have a premade fever tincture, have the patient consume a dose of feverfew and sweet wood root along with lots of water.
Shock Treatment

Give the patient a dose of blessed thistle, thyme, and sweet wood root along with a decent amount of water.

Symptom: Coughing

Treatment

Give the patient a mixture of anise seeds, yerba santa, and honey each morning until their allergies cease.

Symptom: Irritated Throat

Treatment

Give the patient a mixture of eyebright and honey each morning until their allergies cease.

Symptom: Runny/Streaming Nose

Treatment

Give the patient a mixture of mint and yerba santa each morning until their allergies cease. If their nose becomes clogged, have them hold warm/hot, wet moss up to their muzzle and breathe into it for a while. The steamy moss should loosen up any clogged or dried mucus, which should then give them some relief.

Symptom: Sneezing

Treatment

Give the patient a mixture of mint and eyebright each morning until their allergies cease.

Symptom: Watery/Itchy Eyes

Treatment

Give the patient a dose of eyebright each morning until their allergies cease.

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Adder Bite

Symptoms
  • Swelling
  • Bleeding
  • Fever
  • Possible shock
Treatment
  1. Gently dab moist moss on the bite, being careful not to make the wound wet. Immediately dab dry moss on the bite when finished to remove the moisture.
  2. Trickle icy water around the edges of the wound for relief and anti-flammatory purposes.
  3. Cover the bite in a paste of ash tree sprouts, horsetail, poppy seeds, and aloe vera.
  4. Drip the juice from the jasmine flower/root/leaf into the patient's eyes to prevent the poison from circulating through the internal system.
  5. Cover the bite in cobwebs laced with violet mist.
  6. Give the patient a dose of shock root and blessed thistle.
Afterward

Excuse the patient from warrior/apprentice duties for a week. Make sure they eat meals of nutritious, slightly fatty prey while recovering. They should keep water in their veins at all times to help flush out any toxins, and to overall help themselves heal.

Bee Sting

Treatment
  1. Gingerly scrape out the bee's stinger. Do not pull it out with your teeth (the venom sac is at the end and pulling on it will release more venom).
  2. Cool the inflamed skin with damp wads of moss.
  3. Once cooled, apply generous amounts of aloe vera gel.
  4. Once the gel has dried, spread smooth (but not watery) mud across the area of the sting, and wait for it to harden.
  5. When hardened, wash it off with wet, cool moss, and apply a paste of blackberry leaves to the sting.

Rat Bites

Treatment
  1. If severe, the injury should first be attended to using either steps 1-8 under Wounds: Severe Wounds: Second Technique - Stitching, or steps 1-7 under Wounds: Severe Wounds: Third Technique - Cauterization. Continue with the next step afterward. If minor, skip this step and immediately proceed to step 2.
  2. Press a wet wad of moss to the wound to flush out bacteria, grit, and any other toxins. Do this until you're fully confident that the wound is sterile.
  3. Apply a paste of ash tree twigs, burdock root, and wild garlic to the outer edges and flesh walls of the bite.
  4. Seal wound with cobwebs if the third technique wasn't used. If used, do this step after three days.
Afterward

Regularly check for infection, as rat bites can be dangerously infectious. Make sure the patient is staying hydrated and well-fed so that their body can do its best to fight off any infection/disease the rat carried.

(Venomous) Snake Bites

Symptoms
  • Extreme pain where the snake's fangs punctured the skin
  • Two puncture holes
  • Weakness and constant tiredness
  • Redness and swelling
Treatment
  1. Gently dab moist moss on the bite, being careful not to make the wound wet. Immediately dab dry moss on the bite when finished to remove the moisture.
  2. Trickle icy water around the edges of the wound for relief and anti-flammatory purposes.
  3. Cover the bite in a paste of snakeroot, horsetail, poppy seeds, and aloe vera.
  4. Drip the juice from the jasmine flower/root/leaf into the patient's eyes to prevent the poison from circulating through the internal system.
  5. Cover the bite in cobwebs laced with violet mist.
Afterward

Excuse the patient from warrior/apprentice duties for a week. Make sure they eat meals of nutritious, slightly fatty prey while recovering. They should keep water in their veins at all times to help flush out any toxins, and to overall help themselves heal.

Note

Non-venomous snake bites should be treated as regular wounds.

Ticks/Fleas

Treatment
  1. Dab a wad of moss covered in mouse bile on the area of the patient's flesh that the tick inhabits.
  2. Once the tick/flea falls off, a light paste of aloe vera gel and witch hazel root can be applied after washing off the mouse bile.
  3. Wash your paws in a running stream, not with your tongue. If your mouth comes in contact with the bile, it will leave a nasty taste in your mouth for days.

Wasp Sting

Treatment
  1. Cool the inflamed skin down with damp wads of moss.
  2. Once cooled, apply generous amounts of aloe vera gel.
  3. Once the gel has dried, spread smooth (but not watery) mud across the area of the sting, and wait for it to harden.
  4. When hardened, wash it off with wet, cool moss, and apply a paste of blackberry leaves and dandelion stems to the sting.
Note

Bees leave behind stingers when they sting. Wasps do not.

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A Note on Fractured Bones

- Most bones that have only fractured can be treated the same way. -
  1. Lather a poultice of arnica blossoms, birch tree bark, and comfrey root on the appropriate spot.
  2. Form a splint with cobwebs and bindweed/rush, and apply it wherever needed. (For the jawbone, use cobweb only and wrap it around the bottom jaw.)
  3. Give the patient a dose of willow bark and blessed thistle.

OR

  1. Spread a paste of comfrey root, arnica, and calendula petals on the appropriate spot
  2. Form a splint with cobwebs and bindweed/rush, and apply it wherever needed. (For the jawbone, use cobweb only and wrap it around the bottom jaw.)
  3. Give the patient a dose of willow bark and blessed thistle.

Broken Hip

Symptoms
  • The patient is limping severely.
  • One of their haunches seems crumpled.
  • Depending on the circumstance, their hip may be jutting outward.
Treatment (Bent Inward)
  1. Perform Enucleation, having the patient lay on their back, and use a dry, sustainable, sanitary leaf to move the two ends into their correct sockets.
  2. Give the patient a dose of poppy seeds (quantity depending on age; for kits substitute a dandelion stem for poppy seeds, for pregnant queens substitute 2-3 dandelion stems).
  3. Rub a paste of birch tree bark, arnica blossoms, calendula petals, and comfrey root along the hip.
  4. Try to keep the hip in place while it heals by wrapping a tight, thick layer of cobweb around the hips.
  5. Have the patient rest in your den and excuse them from warrior/apprentice duties for 6-8 moons. They should move only when absolutely necessary to avoid further pain and damage.
Treatment (Bent Outward)

Perform the same procedure as shown above, but without using Enucleation. Instead, press down on the jutting end of the pelvis (hip bone) in a quick, precise motion to snap the bone back into place.

Broken Jaw

Symptoms
  • The bottom of the jaw will be shifted to the side.
  • The patient will chew their food with the teeth on the extended side of their mouth, and the rest of their food will dribble from the side.
Treatment
  1. Have the patient lay on their stomach.
  2. Give the patient a thick syrup of bramble twigs, saffron, and chamomile.
  3. Once they fall unconscious, have one cat hold the bottom of the patient's jaw firmly while you hold the extended and crooked sides of their jaw. Have the other cat apply quick, careful pressure to the jaw and push upward, while you push quickly to the side. (Do not perform this procedure if you don't believe that it will fix the problem or if you're not sure you can perform it.)
  4. Apply a paste of birch tree bark, arnica blossoms, and comfrey root along the jawline. Wrap the bottom of the muzzle in a tight, thick layer of cobwebs.
  5. Once the patient is fully conscious, give them a dose of shock root, poppy seeds (quantity depending on age; for kits substitute a dandelion stem for poppy seeds, for pregnant queens substitute 2-3 dandelion stems), and cat's claw.
  6. Have the patient rest in your den and excuse them from warrior/apprentice duties for 6-8 moons.
Afterward

After you finish the patient's procedure, their jaw will be sore while it heals. During this time period, only allow the patient to eat soft foods, such a mouse that has already been chewed. They may also chew witch hazel or alder bark pulp to ease the pain if they can. After their jaw has healed, ease them back onto regular prey.

Broken Leg

Symptoms
  • Front Leg: The front leg will be twisted and will slightly resemble a gnarled root. It will be extended at a weird angle, either behind its normal position or in front of it.
  • Hind Leg: The hind legs will be extended backwards. The cat will be dragging their legs behind them in a painful manner.
Treatment (This works for both the hind leg and the front leg)
  1. Have the patient lay on their side.
  2. Give the patient a thick syrup of bramble twigs, saffron, and chamomile.
  3. Once the patient falls unconscious, position yourself beside the leg. Have a third cat position themselves behind the cat.
  4. Place your paws on the unconscious patient's leg, and have the other cat place their paws on the patient's flank to keep them in place. Maneuver the extended leg back into its socket with quick, careful force (you will hear a click if you succeeded).
  5. Wrap the appropriate part of the leg in birch tree bark, arnica blossoms, and comfrey root.
  6. Position two sticks on opposite sides of the patient's leg, and wrap cobwebs around the two sticks to act as a splint.
  7. Once the patient is fully conscious, give them a dose of shock root, poppy seeds (for kits substitute a dandelion stem for poppy seeds, for pregnant queens substitute 2-3 dandelion stems), and cat's claw.
  8. Have them rest in your den, and excuse them from warrior/apprentice duties for 6-8 moons.

Broken Paw

Symptoms
  • The paw is inflamed and twisted.
  • The patient is limping heavily or raising their paw above the ground.
  • There may be inflamed bumps along a certain toe bone.
Treatment
  1. Have the patient lay on their stomach, broken paw extended.
  2. Give the patient a thick syrup of bramble twigs, saffron, and chamomile.
  3. Once the patient falls unconscious, place yourself in front of the paw. Place one paw on the bent end of the bone, and one paw further up. In a quick, precise motion, press down on the bent end of the bone and snap it back into place, while your other paw is keeping the patient's steady.
  4. Lather the paw in a paste of calendula petals, arnica blossoms, and comfrey root.
  5. Lay a stick horizontally across the paw, making sure it extends to the length of the paw. Break off any excess stick.
  6. Wrap the paw in bindweed and cobweb to act as a splint.
  7. Once the patient is fully conscious, give them a dose of shock root, poppy seeds (for kits substitute a dandelion stem for poppy seeds, for pregnant queens substitute 2-3 dandelion stems), and cat's claw.
  8. Have them rest in your den, and excuse them from warrior/apprentice duties for 6 moons.

Broken Shoulder

Symptoms
  • The patient's shoulder bone is jutting out.
  • They are holding their shoulder gingerly.
  • They are having difficulty walking with their front legs.
Treatment
  1. Have the patient lay on their stomach.
  2. Give the patient a thick syrup of bramble twigs and chamomile.
  3. Once they fall unconscious, position your paws on their shoulders, one paw on each. With quick, careful force, push down on the jutting end of the scapula (shoulder bone) until you hear a click.
  4. Lather the appropriate shoulder in a paste of birch tree bark, arnica blossoms, calendula petals, and comfrey root.
  5. Place a stick horizontally across the patient's scapula, and wrap the shoulders in cobweb and bindweed.
  6. Once the patient is fully conscious, give them a dose of shock root, poppy seeds (for kits substitute a dandelion stem for poppy seeds, for pregnant queens substitute 2-3 dandelion stems), and cat's claw.
  7. Have them rest in your den, and excuse them from warrior/apprentice duties for 6-8 moons.
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Dislocated Hip

Symptoms
  • The patient is walking strangely, not putting very much weight on their hind legs, and wincing when they do.
  • The hip is jutting out at an abnormal angle.
Treatment
  1. Have the patient lay on their stomach.
  2. Give the patient a thick syrup of bramble twigs, saffron, and chamomile.
  3. Once they fall unconscious, position your paws on top of the pelvis (hip bone). In a quick, precise motion, apply pressure to the bone on the dislocated end until you hear a click, signaling that the bone is back in place.
  4. Lather the hip in a paste of daisy leaves, calendula petals, and arnica.
  5. Try to keep the hip in place while it heals by wrapping a tight, thick layer of cobweb around the hips.
  6. Once the patient is fully conscious, give them a dose of shock root, poppy seeds (for kits substitute a dandelion stem for poppy seeds, for pregnant queens substitute 2-3 dandelion stems), and cat's claw.
  7. Have the patient rest in your den, and excuse them from warrior/apprentice duties for 2-4 weeks. They should move only when absolutely necessary to avoid further pain.

Dislocated Jaw

Symptoms
  • The bottom of the jaw will be shifted to the side.
  • They will chew their food with the good molars on the stretched side of their face, and the rest of their food will dribble from the side.
  • They will wince every time they need to use their jaw, as if they had a consistent toothache.
Treatment
  1. Have the patient lay on their back.
  2. Give the patient a thin syrup of bramble twigs, saffron, and chamomile.
  3. Once they fall unconscious, have one cat hold the bottom of the patient's jaw firmly while you hold the extended and crooked sides of their jaw. Have the other cat apply careful pressure to the jaw and push downward, while you push quickly to the side.
  4. Apply a paste of daisy leaves, calendula petals, and arnica along the jawline.
  5. Wrap the bottom of the muzzle in a tight, thick layer of cobwebs.
  6. Once the patient is fully conscious, give them a dose of shock root, poppy seeds (quantity depending on age; for kits substitute a dandelion stem for poppy seeds, for pregnant queens substitute 2-3 dandelion stems), and cat's claw.
  7. Have the patient rest in your den and excuse them from warrior/apprentice duties for 2-3 weeks.

Dislocated Leg

Symptoms
  • The leg will be twisted and will slightly resemble a gnarled root.
  • The leg will be extended at a weird angle, either behind its normal position or in front of it.
Treatment
  1. Have the patient lay on their side.
  2. Give the patient a thin syrup of bramble twigs, saffron, and chamomile.
  3. Once the patient falls unconscious, position yourself beside the leg. Have a third cat position themselves behind the cat.
  4. Place your paws on the unconscious patient's leg, and have the other cat place their paws on the patient's flank to keep them in place. Maneuver the extended leg back into its socket with quick, careful force (you will hear a click if you succeeded).
  5. Lather the leg in a paste of daisy leaves, calendula petals, and arnica.
  6. Wrap the appropriate part of the leg in birch tree bark, nettle leaves, and comfrey root.
  7. Position two sticks on opposite sides of the patient's leg, and wrap cobwebs around the two sticks to act as a splint.
  8. Once the patient is fully conscious, give them a dose of shock root, poppy seeds (for kits substitute a dandelion stem for poppy seeds, for pregnant queens substitute 2-3 dandelion stems), and cat's claw.
  9. Have them rest in your den, and excuse them from warrior/apprentice duties for 2-4 weeks.
  10. Change the patient's paste, cobwebs, and sticks regularly until the leg heals.

Dislocated Paw

Symptoms
  • The paw is inflamed and twisted.
  • The patient is limping heavily on that leg.
Treatment
  1. Have the patient lay on their side, dislocated paw extended.
  2. Give the patient a thin syrup of bramble twigs, saffron, and chamomile.
  3. Once the patient falls unconscious, place yourself in front of the paw. Place one paw on the back of the patient's paw, and one paw on the front. In a quick, precise motion, press down on the bent end of the bone and snap it back into place, the paw on the other side keeping the patient's paw stable.
  4. Lather the paw in a paste of daisy leaves, calendula petals, and arnica.
  5. Lay a stick horizontally across the paw, making sure it extends to the length of the paw. Break off any excess stick.
  6. Wrap the paw in bindweed and cobweb to act as a splint.
  7. Once the patient is fully conscious, give them a dose of shock root, poppy seeds (for kits substitute a dandelion stem for poppy seeds, for pregnant queens substitute 2-3 dandelion stems), and cat's claw.
  8. Have them rest in your den, and excuse them from warrior/apprentice duties for 2-3 weeks.
  9. Change the pastes, cobweb, and stick regularly until the paw heals.

Dislocated Shoulder

Symptoms
  • The patient's shoulder bone is jutting out.
  • They are delicately poising their shoulder, as if they were in pain.
  • They are having difficulty walking with their front legs.
Treatment
  1. Have the patient lay on their stomach.
  2. Give the patient a thick syrup of bramble twigs, saffron, and chamomile.
  3. Once they fall unconscious, position your paws on their shoulders, one paw on each. With quick, careful force, push down on the jutting end of the scapula (shoulder bone) until you hear a click.
  4. Lather the appropriate shoulder in a paste of daisy leaves, calendula petals, and arnica.
  5. Place a stick horizontally across the patient's scapula, and wrap the shoulders in a tight layer of cobweb.
  6. Once the patient is fully conscious, give them a dose of shock root, poppy seeds (for kits substitute a dandelion stem for poppy seeds, for pregnant queens substitute 2-3 dandelion stems), and cat's claw.
  7. Have them rest in your den, and excuse them from warrior/apprentice duties for 2-4 weeks.
  8. Change the pastes, cobweb, and stick regularly until the shoulder heals.
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Drowning

Treatment
  1. Immediately after the patient is rescued, quickly check their temperature and heartbeat. If their temperature is too high or too low, they are close to death.
  2. If they show no immediate signs of responding, perform CPR (Heart/Lung Resuscitation) until their chest is repeatedly rising and falling in a regular pattern (if they don't respond after 3 minutes, they have died).
  3. Give the cat a dose of shock root and blessed thistle along with 1-2 chamomile petals.
Afterward

Let the patient rest in the sun to dry their pelt, along with rubbing their fur backwards with dry wads of moss. Make sure they lay on their stomach, limbs tucked under their chest, for proper blood flow and to keep their limbs close to their central body heat. Have them rest in your den for the night, and excuse them from warrior/apprentice duties until they are back to normal, with no signs of illness.

Heatstroke

Symptoms
  • Rapid breathing
  • Oral redness
  • Vomiting
  • Sluggishness/fatigue
  • Stumbling/staggering
  • Hot skin
Treatment
  1. Bring the cat into a shaded area, preferably your den or a cave/cavern.
  2. Immerse the patient in cold water, or squeeze cold water from a wet wad of moss onto the patient's forehead, torso, and stomach. Place excess wet wads of moss in those places as well.
  3. If conscious, the cat should drink from a wet moss ball/wad every 5 minutes (max).
  4. If unconscious, spread a paste of maple tree bark and mint on their tongue to awaken them, while dripping water into their mouth since they cannot do so themselves.
Afterward

Continue to keep them hydrated and keep their body temperature down until all symptoms of heatstroke are gone.

Hypothermia/Frostbite

Symptoms
  • Muscle stiffness
  • Shivering
  • Weakness
  • Loss of feeling in limbs
  • Shallow/slow breathing
Treatment
  1. Bring the cat into an area that is blocked from the wind and weather, preferably your den.
  2. Keep all limbs angled below the heart for proper bloodflow, and give them a dose of blessed thistle.
  3. If the cat possesses any frostbitten areas, attempt to warm them up with warm rocks/body heat. If you do not succeed in doing this, drastic measures must be taken and the appropriate limb/tail must be amputated.
  4. Have a few cats who the patient would be comfortable with curl up next to the cat to share their body heat.
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Colds

Symptoms
  • Sneezing frequently or uncontrollably
  • Runny/clogged nose
  • Temporary loss of sense of smell
  • Twitching of the eyelid
  • Puffy/watery eyes
Treatment
  • Give the patient a daily dose of angelica, mint leaves, and basil leaves.
  • If they acquire a headache or a fever, follow the appropriate treatment listed under Fevers and Headaches.
Afterward

Keep the patient out of harsh weather and make sure they're comfortable. Keep them in your den if you feel that it's necessary to keep the virus from spreading. They should consistently drink water to keep fluid in their veins, and should eat meals of nutritious, slightly fatty prey. Excuse them from warrior/apprentice duties until their cold clears up.

Tip

If their nose becomes clogged, have them hold warm/hot, wet moss up to their muzzle and breathe into it for a while. The steamy moss should loosen up any clogged or dried mucus, which should then give them some relief.

Eye Problems

Blurry Vision

Trickle willow tree sap into the patient's eyes.

Eye Infection

Apply a thin paste of broken rosemary blossoms to the patient's eyelids. Have them consume eyebright as well.

Eye Pain 

Apply a paste of broken rosemary blossoms around the patient's eyes.

Wounds on/Around the Eye

Apply a paste of broken rosemary blossoms and calendula petals, laced with violet mist, to the wound. Drip willow tree sap and celandine juice into the patient's eyes each day until the wound heals.

Fever/Headaches

Fever

A tincture will be helpful to aid the recipient in this scenario. Only use if a tincture is readily available, do not make the patient wait while you mix a tincture.

  1. Chew a chunk of valerian root, two ragweed leaves, and two tansy petals into a pulp together.
  2. Transfer it to a magnolia leaf, and set aside.
  3. Crush a juniper berry into a decent amount of water and a few drops of honey on another magnolia leaf.
  4. Add the valerian root mixture to the juniper berry mixture.
  5. Set in the sun for 10 days.
  6. Wrap the mixture up with the chosen leaf while in storage. When ready to use, dab a damp ball of moss into the tincture's contents, and have the feverish patient lap it up.
Fever w/ Headache

Chew 2 basil leaves into a pulp alongside a mild dose of feverfew. Mix with a large amount of water on a magnolia leaf and give to the patient.

Headache
  1. Mix a few basil leaves into a large amount of water.
  2. Give the patient the mixture.
  3. Keep them isolated from stimulation until their headache is gone.

OR

  1. Give the patient a dose of willow tree bark/a poppy seed.
  2. Keep them isolated from stimulation until their headache is gone.

Mouth Problems

Mouth Sores/Fever Blisters

Have the patient chew 2-3 basil leaves.

Toothaches

Have the patient chew a mixture of alder bark and coptis, or either one of the two.

Tooth Decay

Have the patient chew a mixture of coptis and alfalfa.

Seizures

Symptoms
  • Collapsing
  • Going stiff
  • Convulsing/writhing
  • Foam/vomit trickling from the patient's mouth
Treatment
  • Lay the patient on their side. This will prevent them from choking on their tongue. Have another cat hold them in that position if they aren't able to stay there themselves.
  • In some cases, the cat will jerk violently with their limbs (writhe), as they will have no control over their body. Have a few cats help you hold down their limbs so that they don't knock into anything.
  • Keep reassuring them, telling them it's going to be okay. In some cases, they will be able to hear clearly, but they won't be able to speak. It will calm them down, knowing that they're being helped and assured.
  • Seizures can last from a few seconds to a few minutes. The patient will not be able to swallow anything during the seizure, so don't try to feed them any herbs. This will only lead to choking.
  • Once the seizure ends, they will be disoriented and exhausted. Give them shock root, blessed thistle, and chamomile petals in small doses and have them rest.

Sleep/Unconsciousness

Difficulty Sleeping
  • (Skip this for kits/nursing queens) Give the patient a poppy seed.
  • (Optional) Weave 3-5 lavender petals into their nest.
Insomnia

Insomnia occurs when a cat has trouble sleeping/staying asleep for countless nights in a regular pattern. It is usually a symptom of allergies, lack of exercise, depression, anxiety, or poor sleep habits in general.

  • To ease their sleep, give the patient 1-2 poppy seeds (depending on their age; do not do this step for kits and nursing queens) every other night.
  • Line their nest with a few lavender petals as well. This will help them achieve more rest and improve their sleep habits.
  • Insomnia can be fully cured by the patient improving their sleep habits, eventually getting over their depression/anxiety, or being treated for allergies.
Loss of Consciousness/Fainting
  1. Spread a paste of maple tree bark and mint on the unconscious patient's tongue.
  2. Give them a dose of shock root and blessed thistle once they are fully awake.
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Heartburn

Symptoms
  • Vomiting after eating
  • An acidic feeling in throat/mouth
  • Pain during swallowing
  • Weight loss
  • Decreased appetite
Treatment

Give the patient a dose of dill alongside small, consistent amounts of water over long periods of time.

Indigestion

Treatment

Have the patient consume hawthorn berries alongside small amounts of water.

(Kit) Indigestion

Treatment

Mix a few stalks of heather with water, and give to the receiving kit.

Internal Bleeding

(First thought of by XxDisneyxX on her page, Herbs for Medicine Cats)

β€‹πŸŒ±Note: Internal bleeding occurs when damage to an artery or vein allows blood to escape the circulatory system and collect inside the body. http://www.medicinenet.com/internal_bleeding/article.htm

  1. Have the patient lay on their back.
  2. Give them a syrup of bramble twigs, saffron, and lavender, thickened with honey.
  3. Wait until the patient's breathing becomes steady and regularly paced, signaling their unconsciousness.
  4. Take a sharp, sterile rock or claw and cut a clean line wherever you're performing the procedure.
  5. Gingerly press warm, damp, sterile moss to the laceration to sponge any blood that trickles out. Use the moss to move the edges of the cut around as well to give yourself space to work. Never use your paws or claws while working in the cat's insides.
  6. Using sterile cobwebs, gradually apply small amounts of pressure to the bleeding organ. Never apply a large or forced amount of pressure, for the organ may rupture.
  7. Do what you feel that you need to aid the stoppage of bleeding in the organ. Stitching it is a definite no. It is beyond your control if the organ is already ruptured.
  8. Make sure that the bleeding has stopped completely before you follow Steps 8-9 under Incisions. This step is not optional, because the patient's insides cannot be exposed for too long.
  9. Once the patient becomes fully conscious, feed them a dose of willow bark, shock root, and blessed thistle.

🌱Afterward: Have the patient rest in your den for the next few moons. Make sure they stay hydrated and eat meals of nutritious, slightly fatty prey. Poppy milk can be consumed for any pain that occurs when the willow bark wears off.

Intestinal Pain

Treatment

Give the patient a dose of ash tree seeds alongside small amounts of water.

The Stomach

Stomach Aches

Give a mixture of 1-2 of these herbs:

  • Basil leaves
  • Blueberries
  • Calendula petals
  • Chervil
  • Fennel seeds
  • Juniper berries
  • Mallow leaves
  • Oregano
  • Parsley
  • Watermint
Nausea

Give the patient a small dose of peach leaves or ginger root alongside small, consistent amounts of water.

Vomiting
  1. Retrieve a large beech or magnolia leaf to catch the patient's vomit.
  2. Have the patient consume a small dose of willow leaves.
  3. After they have ceased to vomit, give them anise seeds or peppermint leaves to cleanse their mouth (as they may find that their mouth tastes horrible after vomiting) alongside decent, yet gradually given amounts of water.
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Muscle Cramps

Treatment

Give the patient a dose of belladonna seeds and huckleberries.

Pregnancy Cramps

Treatment

Give the patient a dose of windflower sprouts and fennel stalks. Crushed iris petals can be given additionally.

Sore Muscles

Treatment

Weave comfrey root into the patient's nest and apply an arnica blossom ointment to the appropriate area.

Sprains

Symptoms
  • Inability to use the limb/joint
  • Limping
  • Pain
  • Swelling
Treatment
  1. Apply a poultice of arnica blossoms, daisy leaves, and calendula petals to the sprain.
  2. Wrap the appropriate area tightly in cobweb and bindweed/rush.
  3. Give the patient a dose of turmeric root or poppy milk.

Stiff/Aching Joints

Treatment

Give the patient a dose of daisy leaves and apply a poultice of comfrey root to the appropriate joint(s).

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Cracked/Sore Pads

Treatment

Apply a poultice of yarrow and sage root to the pad(s).

Thorns

Treatment
  1. Once you've located the thorn, grip the sides with your teeth.
  2. Pull it out cleanly, trying not to wiggle it out if possible.
  3. Apply a paste of hazelnuts, bay leaf, and sage root to the pad.
  4. Wrap the paw in cobweb to secure the dressing.
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To Expel Unwanted Contents

Treatment
  1. Feed the poisoned cat yarrow.
  2. Once they vomit the poison, they should be given time to rest and restore their energy. Don't try to feed them anything else just yet, as the yarrow will only cause them to vomit it. They can be given minimal amounts of water over long periods of time.
  3. After approximately twelve hours, the cat can be given a dose of willow leaves, peach leaves, and hawthorn berries.
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Asthma

Symptoms
  • Wheezing and coughing while exercising
  • Inflamed throat
Treatment

Feed the patient a mixture of ginger roots and mint alongside a decent amount of water each time they experience an asthma attack. They should consume honey afterward.

Blood Circulation Failure

Symptoms
  • Sluggishness
  • Dizziness
  • Chills
  • Weakness
Treatment

Give the patient a dose of blessed thistle alongside lots of cool water.

Bronchitis

Symptoms
  • Difficulty Breathing
  • Wheezing
  • Coughing
  • Coughing fits followed by gagging/vomiting
Treatment
  • Give the patient a daily dose of yerba santa, basil leaves, angelica, and bee balm leaves.
  • Have them yowl to clear their lungs if they develop excess mucus in them.
Afterward

Have the patient rest in your den and excuse them from warrior/apprentice duties until their virus clears up. They should consistently drink water to keep fluid in their veins, and should eat meals of nutritious, slightly fatty prey. Keep them away from others to reduce the risk of the disease spreading.

Difficulty Breathing

Treatment

Give the patient a dose of coltsfoot petals and mint leaves alongside warm water.

Heart Attack

Note

Heart attacks occur when blood is stopped from making its journey to the heart. Blockages like this usually occur if the patient is suffering from heart disease, which is usually in an older cat. Heart attacks aren't common in cats, but they are still deadly.

Symptoms
  • Violent convulsing/writhing/spasms
  • Collapsing
  • Foam dripping from the patient's mouth
Treatment

At first, try feeding the cat a mixture of blessed thistle and a cayenne pepper. If that fails to work, drastic measures must be taken and the cat should be fed a few foxglove seeds. Even though consuming these seeds can be fatal fatal, they also have a minor chance of aiding the heart.

Hyperventilation

Treatment
Give the patient a dose of coltsfoot and lavender petals alongside warm water.
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Blisters

Treatment

Apply a generous amount of aloe vera gel to the blister.

Burns

Treatment
  1. Engulf a wet wad of moss in a mild mixture of aloe vera gel and honey.
  2. Dab onto the burn until it is covered in the mixture.
  3. Wrap in a sterile layer of cobwebs.

Irritated Skin

Treatment

Mix a paste of watercress with a generous amount of watercress, and apply to the skin.

Skin Sores

Treatment

Apply a poultice of witch hazel along with generous amounts of aloe vera gel to the store.

Swelling

Treatment

Apply a poultice of calendula petals or stinging nettle seeds to the inflamed area. Icy water, if available, can also be trickled on/around the edges of the swelling.

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Inflamed Throat

Treatment

Chew 3-4 calendula petals into a pulp, and give to the patient.

Minor/Mild Coughs

Regular Cough

🌱Mucus-Realated Cough: If the cough is related to excess mucus, give the patient a daily dose of chickweed and basil leaves along with a decent amount of water. If the cough worsens, have the patient consume a few catmint leaves.

🌱Dry Cough: If the cough is related to an irritated or dry throat, give the patient a daily dose of tansy and honey, along with a decent amount of water. If the cough worsens, have the patient consume angelica.

Kittencough

Symptoms

Kittencough is a less common version of whitecough that only kits can catch. Kits can catch whitecough as well, but they can also catch this disease.

  • Minor fever
  • Coughing up green-tinted mucus
  • Nose running and clogged with mucus
  • Glossy and crusty eyes
Treatment
  • Give the kit a small dose of the inside of the pawpaw fruit, feverfew, and angelica once each day.
  • Feed them mint additionally to clear their nose of mucus.
  • Consistently wipe the crust from their eyes and nose with warm, damp, sanitary moss.
  • Have them yowl to clear their lungs of mucus if needed.
Afterward

Keep the kit out of harsh weather and make sure they're comfortable. They should keep water in their veins at all times, and should eat meals of nutritious, fatty prey. Keep them away from other kits to lower the risk of the disease spreading, and have them rest until all signs of the disease are gone.

Outcome
  • Severe cases are fatal to kits.

Smoke Inhalation

Treatment
  • Gradually trickle honey and water down the patient's throat.
  • Massage their chest to aid their breathing.
  • Feed them coltsfoot and mint additionally.

Sore Throat

Treatment
Give the patient a dose of honey and tansy along with gradual amounts of warm water.
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*Credit to YureiCat's Medicine Cat Guide for most of the imformation in this section.

Minor Wounds

Some treatment options include (but are not limited to) -
  • Ash tree twig and burdock root paste
  • Caraway paste/poultice
  • Bay leaf and dock leaf poultice
  • Raspberry leaf paste, laced with violet mist
  • Cobwebs (not as effective as other methods, but good for when you have limited resources or are in a rush)
  • Horsetail and cranberry paste
  • Ferns/moss (packed inside less severe wounds while working on another one, this is only temporary)

Minorly Infected Wounds

Some treatment options include (but are not limited to) -
  • Horsetail and snakeroot poultice
  • Chervil paste
  • Applying violet mist
  • Drinking the sap of the sweet sedge stalk
  • Rolling in wild garlic/applying a wild garlic paste

Severely Infected Wounds

Some treatment options include (but are not limited to) -
  • Water violet and violet mist poultice
  • Wild garlic poultice
  • Sweet wood root and horsetail poultice

Severe Wounds

There are two main techniques that work the best to stop blood flow in severe wounds (Credit goes to YureiCat's Medicine Cat Guide for these techniques; I do not own them).

First Technique - Simply Herbs

  1. Press a wet wad of moss to the wound to flush out bacteria, grit, and any other toxins. Do this until you're fully confident that the wound is sterile.
  2. Gingerly apply a lather of violet mist to the wound's flesh walls.
  3. Spread aloe vera gel and a paste of cranberry on top of the violet mist.
  4. Apply a light paste of turmeric root to the wound's deepest section.
  5. Begin to gently and gradually pack the wound with ferns or moss.
  6. Apply a thick cobweb wrapping on top of the laceration densely.

Note that this method is not 100% effective, but can be used if you're not comfortable with the other two techniques or if you are in a hurry, such as during a battle.

Second Technique - Stitching

  1. Press a wet wad of moss to the wound to flush out bacteria, grit, and any other toxins. Do this until you're fully confident that the wound is sterile.
  2. Gingerly apply a lather of violet mist to the wound's flesh walls.
  3. Line the inside of the wound with a thin layer of cobwebs and a paste of turmeric root and aloe vera.
  4. Gently scrub the outside edges of the wound with a moist wad of moss to further sterilize it.
  5. Rub a paste of witch hazel and turmeric root onto the outside edges of the wound.
  6. Have another cat pin the patient to keep them still. A chamomile petal can be given to the patient as well to relax them if they are conscious.
  7. With the patient pinned, have the third cat dully bite the two ends of the lacerated flesh together so that they meet.
  8. Retrieve a sterile, violet mist laced thorn or cactus needle. With great care, push the object through the two ends of the flesh, pinning them together and closing the wound.
  9. Leaving the thorn/cactus needle in, rub the walls with a paste of oak tree sap and broom and cover it with cobwebs. Take the object out after a week and check for infection.
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There are three forms of one of the most common and deadly diseases known to the Clan cats- whitecough, greencough, and blackcough. The color in the name refers to the color of mucus the cat coughs up when acquiring the disease. When experiencing whitecough, the least fatal disease, a cat may cough up clear, or "white" mucus. They will cough up green-tinted mucus with greencough. With blackcough, the cat will cough up murky brown, or "black" mucus, signaling that there is blood mixed in with the mucus. Blackcough is also referred to as redcough because of the blood.

Whitecough

Symptoms
  • Minor fever
  • Coughing up green-tinted mucus
  • Nose running and clogged with mucus
  • Glossy and crusty eyes
Treatment

Give the patient a dose of yerba santa, feverfew, and catmint twice a day. Sweet wood root can also be given to enhance the effect. Give them small amounts of mint as well, and consistently wipe the crust from their eyes and nose with warm, damp, sanitary moss. Have them yowl to clear their lungs of mucus if needed.

Afterward

Keep the patient out of harsh weather and make sure they're comfortable. They should keep water in their veins at all times, and should eat meals of nutritious, fatty prey when available. Keep them away from others to lower the risk of the disease spreading. Excuse them from warrior/apprentice duties until all signs of the disease are gone.

Outcomes
  • Can result death for cats with a weak immune system (kits and elders especially).
  • Can result in greencough.

Greencough

Symptoms
  • Feverish chills
  • High fever
  • Coughing up dark green-tinted mucus
  • Nose running heavily and extremely clogged with mucus
  • Watery and crusty eyes
  • Crust around the nose
Treatment
  • Give the patient a mild or large dose (depending on their age) of catmint, feverfew, and angelica twice each day. Sweet wood root can also be given to enhance the effects of the herbal mixture.
  • If they show signs of growing weakness or refuse to eat, give them chives, chamomile, and chicory.
  • Give them mint to clear the mucus from their nose.
  • Consistently wipe the crust from their eyes and nose with warm, damp, sanitary moss.
  • Have them yowl to clear their lungs of mucus if needed. Yerba santa can also be given for this purpose.
  • If the patient is in pure agony and you can't get any herbs to work, ask permission to send them to StarClan with a deathberry. At this point, it is the kindest thing to do. It is a less painful death than the disease, and there is no shame in putting a cat out of their misery.
Afterward

Keep the patient out of harsh weather and away from others, preferably in your den. Make sure they eat frequently (even a few mouthfuls helps), are comfortable, and are keeping water in their veins. Excuse them from warrior/apprentice duties until all signs of the disease are gone.

Outcomes
  • Greencough is a fatal disease and can cause entire camps to die out if it is not contained or stopped from spreading.
  • In rare cases, it can develop into blackcough, which is why it is so vital to treat.

Blackcough (Redcough)

Symptoms

Blackcough/Redcough is a very rare, worsened form of greencough in which the patient coughs up blood.

  • Constant feverish chills
  • Extremely high fever
  • Coughing up large amounts of brown or black-tinted mucus and possibly blood
  • Nose running heavily and clogged to the point where the patient cannot breathe through their nose
  • Constantly watery and crusty eyes
  • An increased amount of crust around the nose
  • Extreme weakness and refusing to eat or drink
Treatment
  • Give the patient large doses of strawberries, elder leaves, and feverfew 2-3 times each day, alongside oak tree sap to weaken the disease. Sweet wood root can also be given to enhance the effects of the herbal mixture.
  • Give them mint to clear the mucus from their nose.
  • If you do manage to weaken or contain the disease rather than cure it, switch their dose to a mixture of catmint, feverfew, and ginger to treat it.
  • Consistently wipe the crust from their eyes and nose with warm, damp, sanitary moss.
  • Have them yowl to clear their lungs of mucus if needed. Yerba santa can also be given for this purpose.
  • If the patient is in pure agony and you can't get any herbs to work, ask permission to send them to StarClan with a deathberry. At this point, it is the kindest thing to do. It is a less painful death than the disease, and there is no shame in putting a cat out of their misery.
Afterward

Keep the patient out of harsh weather in your den, and away from others to keep the disease from spreading. Make sure they are eating continuously (even a few mouthfuls helps), are comfortable, and are keeping water in their veins. Excuse them from warrior/apprentice duties until all signs of the disease have gone.

Outcomes
  • Blackcough/Redcough is not as common as greencough, but can still wipe out entire camps if not contained and treated. It is very contagious.
  • Can result in death.
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Idea from YureiCat's Medicine Cat Guide.

Spinal cord

The spinal cord is highlighted in blue.

🌱Note: The backbone, or spinal cord, is one of the most important bones in the cat's body. When broken, it can do serious damage. Here are all of the possible breaks to the spinal cord and how they will effect the cat who experiences them.

Cerebral Vertebrae (Neck Bone)
Cerebral vertebrae

The cerebral vertebrae is highlighted in green.

🌱Breakage Effect: The breaking of this bone, if damaged beyond recognition, will result in temporary front leg paralyzation for up to a moon. If not, it should be treated like any other broken bone.

🌱Treatment: If fractured, perform the steps under Broken Bones: A Note on Fractured Bones. If the front legs are paralyzed:

  • The patient will be in shock soon after paralysis. Give them a dose of chamomile petals and lavender petals, and keep reassuring them. Comfort from their family is allowed as well.
  • The patient must still exercise their front legs. If possible, take them to wade in a lake, pond, or sluggish stream and walk around for a while. The water will take weight off of their limbs and allow them to exercise without putting stress on their paralyzed limb(s).
  • Have the patient caterwaul/yowl/wail to clear mucus from their lungs, as they cannot exercise the same way others can.
Thoracic Vertebrae (Upper Backbone)
Thoracic spikes

The thoracic vertebrae is highlighted in blue.

🌱Breakage Effect: The breaking of this bone will result in severe pain and temporary paralyzation of the hind legs for up to 8 moons.

🌱Treatment:

If fractured, perform the steps under Broken Bones: A Note on Fractured Bones. If the front legs are paralyzed:

  • The patient will be in shock soon after paralysis. Give them a dose of chamomile petals and lavender petals, and keep reassuring them. Comfort from their family is allowed as well.
  • The patient must still exercise their front legs. If possible, take them to wade in a lake, pond, or sluggish stream and walk around for a while. The water will take weight off of their limbs and allow them to exercise without putting stress on their paralyzed limb(s).
  • Have the patient caterwaul/yowl/wail to clear mucus from their lungs, as they cannot exercise the same way others can.
Lumbar Vertebrae (Lower Backbone)
Lumbar vertebrae

The lumbar vertebrae is highlighted in red.

🌱Breakage Effect: The breaking of this bone will result in permanent hind leg paralyzation, which cannot be treated or repaired.

🌱Treatment:

  • The patient will be in shock soon after paralysis. Give them a dose of chamomile petals and lavender petals, and keep reassuring them. Comfort from their family is allowed as well.
  • The patient must still exercise their front legs. If possible, take them to wade in a lake, pond, or sluggish stream and walk around for a while. The water will take weight off of their limbs and allow them to exercise without putting stress on their paralyzed limb(s).
  • Have the patient caterwaul/yowl/wail to clear mucus from their lungs, as they cannot exercise the same way others can.
Caudal Vertebrae (Tail Bone)
Caudal vertebrae-0

The caudal vertebrae is highlighted in purple.

🌱Breakage Effect: The breaking of this bone will not result in any paralyzation. However, it may cause damage to the tail's flexibility, as well as leave a kink in the spot where the break occurred.

🌱Treatment: Repair the bone using the steps from Broken Bones: A Note on Fractured Bones.

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🐱 Finding Out 🐱

There are a few things that will first signal a queen's pregnancy. Symptoms include-

  • Fatigue
  • Aches
  • Nausea
  • Sudden food cravings
  • Cramps

If a queen is experiencing any of these symptoms, ask to give them a quick check-up and explain to them that they could possibly be expecting.

  1. Ask the queen to lay on her side.
  2. Crouch down and place your ear next to her stomach. If you hear or feel vibrations, those are the queen's unborn kits. She's expecting!

🐱 Care During Pregnancy 🐱

After a she-cat finds out that she is pregnant, she should immediately move to the nursery. It is not a medicine cat's job to tell the Clan that a queen is pregnant, so you should let the queen tell the cats she chooses to tell herself.

🌱Gestation Period: Anywhere from 64-67 days, approximately 2 moons. It should not exceed 3 moons or be less than 1 moon.

🌱Diet: The she-cat should be allowed to eat her fill, eating fatty prey such as rabbits, mice, and squirrels. She should also consumed 3 borage leaves a day for nutrients. If her contractions are out of control or are causing her pain, allow her to consume a few narcissus leaves.

🌱Hydration: It is very important that the she-cat keeps water in her veins, so make sure she drinks lots of water each day.

🌱Sleep: The she-cat should have at least 3 naps a day and a full night's rest to conserve energy for kitting.

🌱Exercise: The she-cat should go on a few daily walks for exercise.

🌱Cramps: If the queen starts to experience pregnancy cramps, that is perfectly normal. It means that her body is preparing itself for the upcoming kitting. To ease the pain of the cramps, have her consume a few windflower sprouts. Have the queen place warm rocks or moss soaked in hot water onto the area of the cramp to give her temporary relief.

🐱 Kitting 🐱

🌱Note: Soon after the gestation period, the she-cat's contractions should start increasing in force and quantity, and she will go into labor. Make sure she is comfortable, with plenty of moss supporting her head and a few cats (1-4) that she chooses close by.

  1. Coat a stick in crushed raspberry leaves, narcissus leaves, and iris petals.
  2. Place the stick between the queen's jaws. Have another stick close by in case she snaps the first one. (You won't need to coat the second stick.)
  3. Have one cat who has a close relationship with the queen (i.e her mate, mother, sibling, etc.) stay by her head to comfort her. Have them regularly cool the she-cat down with damp wads of moss.
  4. The first of her contractions will stretch out from 10 min.-1 hr. After the first contractions, her first/only kit should be born.
  5. Immediately remove the newborn's amniotic sac and umbilical cord. Groom its fur from tail to neck to warm it up and to get its blood flowing.
  6. Return the kit to its mother's belly and allow it to suckle.
  7. The next kit will be born in 10 min.-1 hr. Repeat steps 5-6 until all of the kits are born.
  8. After the kitting, feed the mother 3 borage leaves, and then leave her and her mate/family alone until sundown. If the kitting took place anywhere besides the nursery, the queen should move to the nursery as soon as she is strong enough.

🌱If the queen produces swelling during labor: If the first of the queen's contractions stretch out longer than an hour during labor, immediately check for swelling. If you spot swelling preventing the queen's kits from being born, or if there is heat radiating off of the queen, inform her right away and tell her to stop pushing. Feed her a few nettle leaves or a few calendula petals and wait until the swelling goes down. Afterward, allow her to push again.

🐱 After Kitting 🐱

🌱Note: During the first week after kitting, with permission from the queen, only 2-3 visitors should be allowed in the nursery per day. Food and water should be brought to the queen regularly, as she shouldn't be expected to retrieve it herself.

🌱Diet: The she-cat should still be allowed to eat her fill, eating around 4 meals a day. She should also consume 2-3 borage leaves to increase the quality and quantity of her milk supply.

🌱Hydration: The she-cat should keep water in her veins at all times to help with the production of milk, so she should drink a large amount each day.

🌱Sleep: The she-cat won't need to sleep as much as she did pre-labor, but she should still take 1-2 naps a day and try to achieve a full night's rest.

🌱Exercise: The she-cat will usually be too preoccupied with her kits and too weak to take walks for the first few weeks, but she should be able to find time to take one once the kits are strong enough to be watched by another queen or by the elders.

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Emotional Issues

Anxiety

Give the patient a dose of aspen tree bark alongside consistent amounts of warm or hot water.

Confidence Loss

Give the patient a dose of chamomile alongside consistent amounts of warm water.

Depression

Give the patient a dose of gotu kola and chamomile alongside consistent amounts of warm water.

Shock

Give the patient a dose of thyme and lavender alongside consistent amounts of warm water.

Stress

Give the patient a dose of lavender alongside consistent amounts of warm or hot water.

Death-Scent

Treatment

Rub a paste of one or more of the following all over the cat's pelt:

  • Lavender petals
  • Mint leaves
  • Rosemary petals
  • Watermint

Horrid Breath

Treatment
Have the cat chew peppermint leaves and/or anise seeds.
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I had lots of fun creating this page and tried to make it as detailed as possible, but I know that I still left out a few things. If you need additional help with anything or would like me to demonstrate something, please ask me on my message wall. My Animal Jam username is Starlitcat if you would like to ask me in a JAG instead.
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Thank-you's:

  • A special thanks to my former mentor, Bluewhisper, for teaching me about herbs, their uses, and how to treat cats. I will always be grateful.
  • A special thanks to XxDisneyxX as well for inspiring me to create this page. A lot of her ideas are on my page as well, and I give her full credit for thinking of them first (i.e Enucleation, Internal Bleeding). The same goes to YureiCat and her Medicine Cat Guide.
  • Thanks to Bronzedew for the border.
  • Thanks to XxCloudstarxX for supplying loads of the pictures under Healing Herbs. It would have taken a lot more time to finish this page if it weren't for her.

Bibliography: