FANDOM


Herbs

"Wisdom is nothing more than healed pain." -Robert Gary Lee

Welcome Insert name here

Watercolor-leaves-2

Side Note

This page is for everyone; whether you are a new Medicine Cat or need to improve your herb knowledge, this is the page for you! If you are a newer Medicine Cat, I also recommend keeping a journal of all of the herbs so that you can look back at it while you're roleplaying and not have to have another tab open to make your screen laggy. I hope this page helps you, and may you have a very nice day!

Watercolor-leaves-2

Herb Care

If any herbs get wet, set them outside in the sun to dry.

Gather only fresh herbs when your stock gets low. (Except if the herb is used dry)

When gathering herbs, don't take too much or all of it. That way, it will be able to grow again for next time.

Frequently check your Herb Storage; there could always be rotting herbs that might ruin the rest of the stock if you don't throw them out.

During Leaf-Fall, gather herbs more often and fill your storage before Leaf-Bare. That way, you won't have to worry about running out of a specific herb.

Check herb patches regularly and tend to them; make sure the herbs have enough sunlight, water, and space. Pull out any weeds that are starting to cramp the patch and stop gathering from that patch if there are any signs of insect infestations.

Watercolor-leaves-2

Herb Vocabulary

Poultice- Made from whole plants that can be either fresh or dried.

Dried Poultice- Made by moistening pulps with just enough water for it to become soft and appliable.

Fresh Poultice- Made by applying pulps and not adding water to moisten them.

Paste- Made from the liquids of herbs.

Pulp- Crushed herbs.

Spread- Another word for Poultice.

Lather- Another word for Paste.

Mixture- A combination of herbs (chewed/crushed or not) or liquids (honey, water, etc.) that is eaten by a cat.

Syrup- A type of mixture that is chewed/crushed, mixed with water, and thickened with honey.

Tincture (Made by Tornclan)- Herbs are made into this when they start to wilt and need to be preserved for freshness to last longer. Usually used for cats with fevers/headaches.

Watercolor-leaves-2

Basic Herbs

Alder Bark

Found on Alder Trees in cool, damp, muggy, or wet places

Chewed to treat toothaches

Alder Bark

-----

Beech Leaves

Found in forests or near rivers

Used to carry and store herbs

Beech Leaves

----

Bindweed

Found anywhere with lots of strong sunlight and low-moisture soil

Used with cobwebs to bind broken, dislocated, or sprained bones to limbs and keep them in place

Bindweed

-----

Blackberry Leaves

Found in twoleg gardens and moist soil

Chewed into a poultice to treat bee/wasp stings

Blackberry Leaves

-----

Borage Leaves

Found in deciduous forests

Chewed and eaten to make queens produce more/better milk; feed only 3 leaves

Also helps bring down fevers

Borage Leaves

-----

Eyebright

Found in meadows and grassy areas with cold climates

Eaten to soothe sneezing, watery eyes, and irritated throats

Can be mixed with Lovage to cure coughs

Brighteye

----

Broom

Found in thick forests

Applied as a poultice and placed on bad sprains/dislocations

Can be mixed with Comfrey as a poultice to help heal broken bones/limbs

Broom

----

Burdock Root

Found in dry places

Applied as a poultice to heal infected rat bites or prevent infection from rat bites

Burdock Root

----

Burnet

​Found in arid and grassy soil

Eaten for strength and to subside hunger

One of the four Traveling Herbs

Burnet

----

Catchweed

​Found on hedges in twoleg gardens and wet places

Burrs prevent cobwebs, pastes, or poultices from rubbing off of a cat's pelt

Stems are eaten to help with digestive problems

Catchweed

----

Catmint

Found in twoleg gardens

Eaten to cure coughs, Whitecough, Greencough, Blackcough, and upper respiratory infections

Catmint

----

Celandine

​Found in dense, deciduous forests and near rivers

Juice from the leaves/stem can be squeezed into damaged eyes and ease the pain and strengthen them

Celandine

----

Chamomile

​Found in twoleg gardens and grassy places

Eaten to soothe minds, strengthen hearts, and give confidence

One of the four Traveling Herbs

Chamomile

----

Chervil

​Found in dense, deciduous forests and in the cracks of rocks

Roots are eaten to help bellyaches and help queens during labor

Leaves are applied as a poultice to treat infected wounds

Chervil

----

Chickweed

​Found in deciduous forests, pastures, and twoleg gardens

Chewed and eaten to treat coughs, Whitecough, and Greencough; only use if Catmint is unavailable

Chickweed

----

Cobnuts (Hazelnuts)

​Found alongside streams, and in meadows, thunderpaths, and forest edges under Hazel Trees

Crushed and chewed to make oitments

Can also be applied to cracked/sore pads

Cobnuts

----

Cobwebs

​Found in forests where spiders are present

Placed on large/deep wounds with presure to slow or stop bleeding

Can be wrapped around sticks to hold a broken bone/limb in place

Can be stretched and placed over poultices

Cobwebs

----

Coltsfoot

​Found in wet places

Leaves are applied as a poultice or pulp to help cracked/sore pads

Eaten to treat Kitten Cough and ease breathing

Coltsfoot

----

Comfrey Root

​Found in grassy fields with moist soil

Applied as a poultice to soothe wounds, and treat wrenched claws, stiff joints, and itchy/irritated skin

Can be mixed with Broom as a poultice and placed on broken bones/limbs to speed up healing

Can be woven into a nest to ease sore muscles

Comfrey Root

----

Daisy Leaves

​Found in grassy places, damp meadows, and damp fields

Applied as a paste and placed onto painful/stiff joints or sprains

One of the four Traveling Herbs

Daisy Leaves

----

Dandelions

​Found anywhere open with moist soil

Leaves/stems are chewed to soothe pain

White liquid inside the stem can be applied to soothe pain and reduce swelling from bee stings

Dandelion

----

Dock Leaves

​Found in dense, deciduous forests and marshes

Applied as a poultice to soothe and speed up the healing of scratches

Applied as a paste to soothe cracked/sore pads

Dock Leaves

----

Elder Leaves

​Found in damp places in rich, damp soil with partial sunlight

Eaten to treat Blackcough and Redcough

Applied as a paste to soothe sprains

Elder Leaves

----

Fennel Seeds

​Found in dry soil near water

Eaten to ease bellyaches, digestive problems, coughs, and unblock mucus

Can also be eaten to prevent vomiting

Fennel Seeds

----

Fennel Stalks

Found in dry soil near water

Eaten to ease pain in the hips

Fennel

----

Feverfew

Found near/along water

Eaten to help with fever and its pains, as well as to ease headaches

Feverfew

----

Goatweed

​Found in any mild places

Eaten to ease grief

Goatweed

----

Goldenrod

Found in open fields and moors

Applied as a poultice on wounds to help them heal

Goldenrod

----

Hawkweed

​Found in open, dry forests

Eaten to treat coughs and Grenncough; only use for Greencough if Catmint is unavailable

Hawkweed

----

Heather

Found in open, sandy soil

Eaten to help increase the lining in kits' intestines; can also be mixed with water

Heather

----

Heather Nectar

Found in open, sandy soil in the shade

Used to sweeten herbs and make swallowing easier; especially for kits

Heather Nectar

----

Honey

Found in bee hives

Eaten to soothe sore throats and give energy

Can be mixed with Aloe Vera to heal burns

Can also sweeten herbs and be applied to poultices/pastes to help them stay in place

Honey

----

Horsetail

Found in marshy places

Applied as a poultice to reduce bleeding and prevent infection

Horstail

----

Ivy Leaves

Found on Ivy Bushes around lots of plants

Herbs can be carried and stored in them

Ivy Leaves

----

Juniper Berries

Found in Juniper Berry Bushes in dry or damp soil

Small amounts are eaten to help bellyaches

Larger amounts are eaten to help breathing

Can be mixed with water to calm a nervous cat

Juniper Berries

----

Lamb's Ear

Found on mountains

Eaten to increase a cat's strength and also calm their nerves

Lamb's Ear

----

Lavender

Found in twoleg gardens or rocky/sandy soil

Eaten to bring down fevers and soothe nerves

Can also be woven into nests to make a cat go unconcious

Lavender

----

Lovage Leaves

Found in twoleg gardens or fertile soil

Can be mixed with Bright Eye to cure coughs

Lovage

----

Lungwort

Found in moors

Eaten to cure Yellowcough

Lungwort

----

Mallow Leaves

Found near shores

Eaten to ease bellyaches and prevent infections 

Can be applied to soothe bee stings

(Best gathered at sunhigh)

Mallow Leaves

----

Marigold

Found near water

Applied as a poultice to heal wounds and clear infections

Marigold

----

Mint Leaves

Found in twoleg gardens and large deciduous forests

Chewed to open up the nose and ease a cat with seasonal allergies

Can be mixed with warm water and eaten to stop hiccups

Rubbed onto a cat's pelt to hide the scent of death

Spread onto a cat's tongue to wake them up

Mint Leaves

----

Moss

Found on objects in damp, shady places

Can be soaked in water and brought to weak cats who need to drink

Can be dampened to sterilize wounds, ease swelling, and ease pain/grief

Can be packed inside wounds while others are being worked on and can be used as bedding or sponges

Moss

----

Mud

​Found in wetlands, anywhere raining, or in/near water

Can be applied to bee stings to soothe swelling and pain

Can be used to help a cat cool off

Do not put anywhere near wounds as it could cause infection

Mud

----

Oak Tree Leaves (Dried)

​Found under Oak Trees during Leaf-Fall

Applied as a poultice to clear infections

Oak Tree Leaves

----

Oak Tree Sap

Found on Oak Trees in wet soil

Eaten to weaken Blackcough

Applied as a poultice to clear infections

Oak Tree Sap

----

Parsley

Found in moist soil with lots of sunlight

Eaten to ease bellyaches or stop a queen from producing milk

Parsley

----

Poppy Milk

​Found in fields and deciduous forests

Eaten to ease pain, especially headaches

Poppy Juice

----

Poppy Seeds

Found in deciduous forests and fields 

Eaten in small amounts to calm a cat's nerves

Eaten in larger amounts to relieve pain

Applied as a paste to extract minor poisons from wounds (like spider bites)

Can be mixed with warm water and eaten to help a cat sleep

Do not feed to kits for it's too strong for them

Do not feed to queens as it could reduce the amount of milk they produce

Poppy Seeds

----

Ragwort Leaves

Found in cool places with lots of rain and wet soil

Can be mixed with Juniper Berries and applied as a poultice to help aching joints

Do not eat, as it's highly poisonous

Ragwort

----

Raspberry Leaves

Found in fertile soil

Chewed to ease the pain of bee stings or help a queen during labor

Can be applied as a paste with Violet Mist to treat minor wounds

Raspberry Leaves

----

Rosemary Blossoms (Broken)

Found in twoleg gardens, deciduous forests, and dry, sandy soil

Applied as a poultice and placed on a cat's eye to help ease pain and infections

Can be rubbed on a dead cat's pelt to hide the scent of deeath

Rosemary

----

Rush Stalks

​Found in moist, semi-fertile soil

Used with Cobwebs to bind broken/dislocated/sprained limbs 

Rush Stalks

----

Snakeroot

Found in warm places

Applied as a poultice on venomous bites to counter the poison or on wounds to clear infections

Snakeroot

----

Sorrel

Found in twoleg gardens/places and sandy soil

Eaten to subside hunger

One of the four Traveling Herbs

Sorrel

----

Sticks

Found on and near trees

Used with Cobwebs to hold a bind a broken/dislocated/sprained limb in place

Can be bitton on and serve as a distraction from pain

Sticks

----

Stinging Nettle

Found in/near deciduous forests

Eaten to treat allergies

Seeds are eaten to fight minor poisons and make a cat vomit

Stem is chewed on to fight intestinal infections

Leaves are applied to bring down swelling

Stinging Nettle

----

Sweet Sedge

Found on shores near water

Nectar from the flower is eaten to soothe intenstinal infections

Sweet Sedge

----

Sweet Sedge Nectar/Sap

​Found in wetlands and near rivers

Eaten to ease intestinal infections

Sweet Sedge Sap

----

Tansy

Found in deciduous forests, twoleg places, and cool/cold places

Eaten in small doses to help with coughs and soothe sore throats

Tansy

----

Thyme

Found in hot places with lots of sunlight

Eaten to calm a cat in shock

Thyme

----

Tormentil

Found in fields

Applied as a poultice to treat wounds, poisons, or stop bleeding

Tormentil

----

Watermint

Found in streams and wet soil

Eaten to treat bellyaches

Watermint

----

Wild Garlic

Found in deciduous forests

Applied/rolled in to prevent infection from rat bites

Wild Garlic

----

Willow Tree Bark

Found on Willow Trees in twoleg gardens or near water

Chewed to soothe aches and pains, especially headaches

Juice from the bark can be trickled into a cat's eye to help bring back sight or soothe pain

Willow Bark

----

Willow Tree Leaves

Found on Willow Trees in twoleg gardens

Eaten to prevent a cat from vomiting

Willow Leaves

----

Willow Tree Sap

​Found on Willow Trees in twoleg gardens or near water

The sap is squeezed into the eye to cure blurry vision

Willow Tree Sap

----

Wintergreen

Found at high altitudes in Oak-Pine forests and sandy soil

Eaten to vomit swallowed poisons in the intestines

Applied as a paste or poultice to heal wounds

Wintergreen

----

Yarrow

Found in/around rocks in rocky soil

Eaten to make a cat vomit up poison

Applied as a poultice or oitment to treat cracked/sore pads

Yarrow

Watercolor-leaves-2

Advanced Herbs

Alfalfa

Found in moist, thick soil in mild climates and sometimes large twoleg fields

Chewed to prevent tooth decay

Alfalfa

----

Aloe Vera

Found in damp soil near water and dry, rocky, open places

Applied as a poultice and placed on burns or damaged skin to treat them. Can also be used to speed up the healing of wounds

Skin from the leaves are applied as a paste to extract poison

Aloe Vera

----

Angelica

​Found in fields, hedgerows, forests, and swamps 

Eaten to treat severe coughs, colds, and chest infections

Also eaten by queens to produce more milk

Angelica

----

Anise Seeds

​Found in thick, deciduous forests

Eaten to ease coughs and digestive problems

Chewed to make a cat's breath smell better

Anise Seeds

----

Apple Blossoms

​Found on Apple Trees in mild places with sunlight

Eaten to treat Depression

Apple Blossoms

----

Arnica Blossoms

​Found in rocky soil and open forests

Applied as an oitment for bruises, sore muscles, and sprains

Applied as a poultice to help with inflammation

Arnica Blossoms

----

Ash Tree Seeds

Found near Ash Trees in mild places with moist soil and direct sunlight

Eaten to help with internal/intestinal pain

Ash Tree Seeds

---- 

Ash Tree Sprouts

Found near Ash Trees in mild places with moist soil and direct sunlight

Applied as a poultice and placed on venomous adder bites

Ash Tree Sprouts

----

Ash Tree Twigs

Found on Ash Trees in mild places with moist soil and direct sunlight

Can be mixed with Burdock Root as a poultice or paste to treat wounds

Ash Tree Twigs

----

Aspen Tree Bark

Found on Aspen Trees in deciduous forests in cool, mild places

Chewed to relieve stress and anxiety

Aspen Tree Bark

----

Basil

Found in twoleg gardens

Eaten to reduce Cholestral, mucus from Asthma, Bronchitis, and Greencough, and to help with bellyaches

Chewed or eaten to relieve mouth sores and treat Kitten Cough

Can be mixed with water and eaten to help headaches

Can be mixed with warm water and gargled to help sore throats

Can be mixed with honey and eaten to break down kidney stones; must be eaten everyday for 6 moons

Can be applied as a paste to cure Ringworm and lesions

Basil

----

Bay Leaves

Found on Bay Trees in rich, damp soil and plenty of sunlight

Applied as a paste to treat small wounds and thorn injuries

Bay leaves

----

Bee Balm Leaves

Found in open fields and thickets with frequent sunlight and dry or slightly damp soil

Eaten to cure colds, ease fevers, and soothe sore throats

Can also act as an antibody for other severe sicknesses

Bee Balm Leaves

----

Billberries

Found on shrubs in cold, sub-arctic places

Applied as a paste and placed on a cat's eye to improve eyesight

Bilberries

----

Birch Tree Bark

Found on Birch Trees in mildly cold places

Applied to broken bones/limbs to speed up healing

Birch Tree Bark

----

Birthwort

Found in or near twoleg places and mulchy places with damp soil

Chewed to help bellyaches and create contractions for delayed births of queens

Use only if a queen's kitting is delayed; using it too early can cause kits to be born premature or stillborn

Birthwort

----

Blackeyed Susans

Found in fields, prairies, open forests, and along thunderpaths

Eaten to cure coughs, colds, and ear infections

Applied as a paste to clear infections and lesions

Blackeyed Susan

----

Blessed Thistle

Found in open places, along shorelines, and in rocky or sandy soil

Chewed and eaten to help blood circulation

Blessed Thistle

----

Blueberries

Found anywhere with lots of sunlight and rocky or sandy soil

Eaten to help fevers and ease bellyaches

Blueberries

----

Boneset (Dried)

Found along streams, swamps, and thickets in low, wet ground

Eaten to cure colds and the flu, and to ease digestive problems, constipation, and appetite loss

Can only be used dried, never fresh; use as a last resort

Boneset

----

Bramble Twigs

Found in thick, deciduous forests

Chewed/crushed into a syrup to help a cat sleep/go unconcious

Can be diluted with water or thickened with honey to determine how long they stay asleep

(Dilute it for shorter times and thicken it for longer times)

Bramble Twigs

----

Buttonbush

​Found in wetlands

Eaten to help with digestive problems

Buttonbush Down

----

Calendula Blossoms

Found in twoleg places and along thunderpaths

Eaten to treat bellyaches and intestinal problems

Applied as a poultice to reduce swelling on inflamed skin and to speed up the healing of wounds

Applied as a paste to treat lesions and soothe skin sores

Calendula Blossoms

----

Caraway

​Found in meadows and along thunderpaths at high altitudes

Eaten to soothe pain, help with fevers, and to produce more milk for queens

Applied as a paste or poultice to treat wounds

Caraway

----

Cayenne Peppers

​Found in twoleg gardens

Eaten to reduce chances of a heart attack and weaken their effects

Can also be eaten to strengthen the heart if a cat swallows Foxglove Seeds

Give the cat water or sweeten the herb as well, for the herb is very spicy

Not recommended for cats with bellyaches

Cayenne

----

Chicory

​Found in fields, along thunderpaths, and twoleg places

Eaten to give energy, appetite, and ease indigestion

Chicory

----

Chives

​Found in damp meadows and rocky pastures

Eaten to give strength

Applied as a poultice to help with wounds and lesions

Applied to wounds to slow bleeding

Chives

----

Cilantro

​Found in fields and near rivers in cold places, and in twoleg gardens

Applied to help heal minor wounds and prevent infections

Can also be used to ease pain

Cilantro

----

Coptis

​Found in boggy wetlands in northern, mild places

Eaten to soothe and break down toothaches

Can be applied to inflamed skin to reduce swelling

Coptis

----

Cranberries

​Found in wetlands

Applied to wounds to help them heal

Cranberries

----

Damiana Sprigs

​Found in twoleg gardens and rarely on moist moortops

Can be mixed with water and eaten to increase circulation

Damiana Sprigs

----

Daylily

​Found in open grasslands, wetlands, and moist forests

Eaten to ease coughs and cure colds

Can be applied to infections and lesions

Daylily

---- 

Dill

​Found in twoleg gardens

Eaten to help deteriorate gas and soothe heartburns

Dill

----

Echinacea

Found in moist soil with other brightly colored plants

Eaten to regulate breathing

Applied as a poultice and placed onto wounds to heal infections

Echinacea

----

Eucalyptus Leaves

​Found in deserts with lots of sunlight

Eaten to ease pain and clear the mind

Eating too much of it can cause bellyaches

Eucalyptus Leaves

----

Ginger

Found in dry, sandy soil

Eaten to help with coughs and soothe nausea

Juices are eaten along with the herb being chewed to treat Asthma

Ginger

----

Goosegrass

Found in large plains, prairies, moors, and fields

Can be used with Cobwebs to stop bleeding

Goosegrass

----

Gotu Kola

Found in damp soils

Eaten to treat depression; larger amounts can prevent cats from becoming fertile

Applied as a poultice to help with scars

Can be mixed with warm water and eaten to clear the mind

Gotu Kola

----

Gumweed

Found in prairies, twoleg places, and along thunderpaths

Eaten to treat Asthma and Bronchitis

Applied as a poultice or paste to heal sores and speed up the sealing of wounds

Gumweed

----

Hawthorn Berries

​Found in open forests, hedgerows, and rocky places

Eaten to help with digestion after a cat has consumed something on accident

Hawthorn Berries

----

Hops

Found on tall plants in clay soil or along rivers

Eaten to calm a cat with anxiety and soothe their nerves

Hops

----

Huckleberries

​Found in cold, semi-high places

Eaten to ease muscle pains

Huckleberries

----

Iris Petals (Crushed)

​Found twoleg gardens or sandy soil in/near water

Eaten to help kits' sore throats (can be mixed with water) and help queens' breathing during kitting

Iris Petals

----

Jasmine

​Found in twoleg places

Applied to venomous bites to stop the poison from spreading

Can be mixed with Rose Petals as a paste to extract poison

Jasmine

----

Kava

​Found in tropical places

Leaves are eaten to help with Anxiety and Insomnia

Only the leaves should be eaten; any other part of the herb is toxic and will cause liver damage

Kava

----

Lemongrass

Found in warm places with damp soil

Eaten to make a cat discharge whatever was causing their bellyache

Can be mixed into a poultice to clean a cat's pelt

Lemongrass

----

Lotus Roots

Found in water with lots of sunlight

Eaten to give energy and help stay awake

Applied as a paste onto a cat's tongue to wake them up

Lotus Roots

----

Magnolia Leaves

Found in mild forests with coniferous and deciduous trees

Used to carry/store herbs or liquids

Magnolia Leaves

----

Maple Tree Bark

​Found on Maple Trees in deciduous forests

Awakens a cat when the herb is spread on their tongue

Maple Tree Bark

----

Milk Thistle

​Found on mountains and rocky places

Eaten by queens to produce more milk, especially during Leaf-Bare

Milk Thistle

----

Milkweed

​Found in meadows, fields, and along thunderpaths

Treats rashes and burns when applied to skin

Only used as an applicant; do not eat it as it's very poisonous

Milkweed

----

Narcissus Leaves

​Found almost anywhere

Eaten by queens during kitting to help with pain

Narcissus Leaves

----

Olive Leaves

​Found on Olive Trees in warm, dry places

Applied to severe wounds and poisons to help them heal

Olive Tree Leaves

----

Oregano

​Found in dry, grassy places

Eaten to ease bellyaches

Oregano

----

Pawpaw Fruit

Found on trees in open, sandy soil

Eaten to cure Kitten Cough

Pawpaw

----

Peach Leaves

Found on Pear Trees in twoleg gardens or rich, moist soil with lots of sunlight

Eaten to ease nausea

Peach Leaves

----

Peppermint Leaves

​Found in moist soil

Chewed to improve the smell of breath

Peppermint Leaves

----

Ragweed Leaves

Found on mountains and prairies

Eaten to increase a cat's strength

Not recommended; only use as a last resort, for many cats are allergic to it

Ragweed

----

Red Oak Leaves (Dried)

​Found under Oak Trees during Leaf-Bare/Leaf-Fall

Applied as a pulp to prevent infections

Dried Red Oak Leaf

----

Roses

​Found in clearings, open forests, and rocky slopes

The petals can be mixed with Jasmine into a paste to extract poison from venomous bites

The petals and thorns can be mixed into a paste to help close wounds

Rose

----

Rose Thorns (Crushed)

​Found on roses in twoleg gardens and in wet, sandy soil

Applied as a paste to cover/seal wounds; crush thorns very well before applying

Rose Thorns

----

Roseweed

​Found in wet forests with rich soil

Can be applied to venomous adder bites to extract poison

Rosewood

----

Rosinweed Leaves

Found on Rosinweed Flowers in grassy fields

Eaten with water to clean out the a cat's digestive system after they've been poisoned

Rosinweed Leaves

----

Saffron

Found in thick, clay soil

Eaten to make a cat go unconcious; keep it hidden, especially from kits and elders

Saffron

----

Sage

Found in twoleg gardens and sandy soil

Eaten as an antibiotic

Applied as a poultice onto a cat's pelt to remove dandruff

Can be mixed with water, crushed, and eaten to help a cat's memory

Sage

----

Saw Palmetto

​Found along coastlines and in Oak-Pine forests

Eaten to treat other, unique illneses

Saw Palmetto

----

Shockroot

Found in damp soil

Eaten and acts as a defibulator for a cat that was poisoned, had a heart-attack, or other severe accident

Shock Root

----

Skullcap Seeds

Found in meadows and fields with dry soil

Eaten to increase a cat's strength

Skullcap Seeds

----

Snapdragon Seeds

Found inside Snapdragon Flowers in grassy places with fertile soil and lots of sunlight

Applied as a poultice to cure Ringworm

Snapdragon Seeds

----

Strawberries

​Found in fields, twoleg gardens, riverbanks, forest margins, and rocky outcrops

Eaten to cure Blackcough

Strawberries

----

Sunflower Seeds

​Found in prairies and twoleg gardens

Eaten to treat Bronchitis and other lung problems/conditions

Sunflower Seeds

----

Sweet Wood Root

​Found in open places with dry or slightly damp soil

Eaten to remove swallowed toxins

Can be added to other herbs to improve their effectiveness

Sweet Wood Root

----

Turmeric Roots

​Found in twoleg gardens

Eaten to soothe pain

Turmeric

----

Valerian Roots

​Found in fields, near water, and forests

Eaten to reduce fevers, chills, and thirst

Valerian Root

----

Violet Mist (Crushed Violet Blossoms)

​Found in prairies, open forests, twoleg gardens/places, and savannas

Applied to wounds to prevent infection

Violet Mist

----

Watercress

​Found in shallow, moving water

Applied to soothe irritated skin and treat lesions

Watercress

----

Water Violet

​Found in ponds and ditches

Applied as a poultice to heal severe wounds

Applied to infected wounds to clear infection

Water Violet

----

Windflower Sprouts

Found in rocky soil

Eaten to help a queen deal with cramps/contractions during kitting

Windflower Sprouts

----

Witch Hazel

Found in dense, deciduous forests with dry soil

Eaten to give energy

Chewed to soothe toothaches

Can be applied to soothe sores, bruises, insect bites, and stop bleeding

Witch Hazel

----

Yerba Santa

Found in dense, Redwood forests near the ocean

Leaves are eaten to control the amount of mucus in a cat's lungs, or induce a cat to expel mucus in order to breathe properly

Yerba Santa

----

Tinctures

(This isn't exactly a herb, but it's a technique used to preserve herbs that are wilting to make them last longer.)

1. Chew up a chunk of Valerian Root, 2 Ragweed Leaves, and 2 Tansy Petals into a pulp. Move it into a Magnolia Leaf, and set it aside.

2. In another Magnolia Leaf, crush a Juniper Berry into a decent amount of water and add a few drops of Honey.

3. Add the Valerian Root mixture to the Juniper Berry mixture and set it in the sun for 10 days.

4. Wrap the mixture up in a leaf while it's in storage. When you're ready to use it, dip a damp moss ball into the Tincture's contents and have the cat lap it up.

(These steps are for creating a Tincture for a cat with a fever.)

Watercolor-leaves-2

Poisons

Boneset

Found near bodies of water

If large amounts are eaten, it can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea

It's very toxic if eaten fresh, and can kill a cat if untreated

Boneset

----

Deadly Dapperling

Found in moist forests

If eaten, it causes major liver damage and a quick death

Deadly Dapperling

----

Death Berries (Yew Berries)

Found in forest gorges

If eaten, it kills a cat right away

Yew Berries

----

Foxglove Seeds

Found anywhere with good climate

If eaten, it causes paralysis and heart failure

Foxglove Seeds

----

Holly Berries

Found in forests

If eaten, it causes lethal bellyaches

Holly Berries

----

Kava

Found in tropical places

If any part other than the leaves are eaten, it can cause liver damage

Kava

----

Milkweed

Found in meadows and fields

It's toxic if eaten or placed around the eyes; can kill a cat if untreated

Milkweed

----

Nightshade

Found in soil with limestone and shade

If eaten, it kills a cat right away

Sometimes used to kill a cat that cannot be saved; keep it hidden, especially from kits

Also known as Belladonna

Deadly Nightshade

----

Ragwort

Found in wet soil in cold places

It's highly poisonous if eaten; can kill a cat if untreated

Ragwort

----

Water Hemlock

Found in marshlands

If eaten, it causes lethal pain, writhing, and foaming at the mouth

Water Hemlock

Watercolor-leaves-2

Other Treatments

Amputation

Amputation is a last-resort procedure only. It's very difficult and things could easily go wrong; only fully-trained medicine cats should even attempt this. Try everything else before deciding to do this, as only 20% of cats survive amputation.

1. Shift the soon-to-be-amputated limb/tail into an upwards position so that the blood drains out from the area. This way, most of the blood will not escape and the cat won't die from blood loss.

2. Create a mild syrup of crushed Bramble Twigs, Lavender, and Saffron and thicken it with honey. Feed this to the cat and wait until their breathing is steady/relaxed and they're unconcious.

3. Break the bone in the limb/tail you're going to amputate by snapping it. Be as swift and fast as you can; this way, the cat will be in less pain (though still a lot) once the procedure is done.

4. Use a sharp, clean rock or your sharpest claw (though a rock is preferred) and cut through the limb's/tail's flesh and muscle. After that, grab some moss and dampen it in cold/warm water (depending on what season it is). Press the dampened moss gently onto the cat's stump. This will expel bacteria and soak up any lost blood.

5. Once the stump is clean, apply a paste of Violet Mist and Honey. Then, apply a few pastes that'll help prevent infection such as Broom Malice, Wild Garlic, or Oak Tree Sap. Add some Sweet Wood Root to strengthen the effects.

6. Wrap the stump in Cobwebs with Goosegrass woven into it. Before the cat fully awakes, give them a dose of Willow Tree Bark or Turmeric Roots.

7. Once the cat is fully awake, give them a dose of Shock Root and Blessed Thistle.

8. For the next few moons, change the Cobweb-Goosegrass covering and pastes regularly. Have the cat rest in your den while the stump heals and also take them to a slow-moving body of water to swim and excercise their body. The cat should also be drinking water all the time (to help with circulation) and eating nutritious, fatty prey. Once the cat is strong enough, help them practice "walking" around their camp; never go too fast, for they may fall over and break the skin of their stump, risking infection to enter. Once they can walk by themselves, they can leave your den.

Compare & Contrast

If there's a cat you know that has a problem, but you can't seem to pinpoint the exact spot or location, you can compare and contrast it with an average cat. (Example: If the patient complains of pain in the back leg and you can't find anything wrong, you can bring in a healthy cat and examine both of their limbs and find the difference/problem.)

CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation)

Use this technique whenever a cat's heart has stopped or they have stopped breathing.

1. Place your paws in the middle of the cat's chest; level with the sternum.

2. Repeatedly press down on their chest around 100 tpm 30 times.

3. After 30 times, tilt their head back, cover their nose, and blow air into their mouth twice. Repeat these steps until the cat responds and their chest rises and falls steadily.

4. When the cat is fully conscious, bring them back to your den (if they're not already there) and feed them a dose of Stinging Nettle, Wintergreen, or Yarrow. This will make them vomit up any water inside their stomachs. (Do this step only if the said cat was involved in a near-drowning)

5. Give the cat a dose of Echinacea to regulate their breathing if it isn't already. Have them rest in your den for the rest of the day; you can let them leave the next day if they've fully recovered.

Grooming/Lapping

Grooming the fur of a cat can help clean wounds, keep them calm, or warm them. Lapping can also be used to keep a cat warm; this is especially used during the kitting of a queen. As soon as a kit is born, lap their fur the opposite direction. This will get their blood circulating and raise their body temperature.

Mousebile

 Mouse Bile is a liquid used to kill ticks. It's found anywhere where mice live and it's often used on elders' pelts. Make sure to use a moss ball or clean leaf when handling the substance. Don't put too much of it on; a tick will die instantly with only a dab of it. Once you're done, make sure to wash your paws in a running body of water.

Nipping/Biting Bones

If you're not sure on whether a bone is broken or not, you can lightly nip or bite it. If the cat yowls or you feel a crack, it's broken.

Stitching

Stitching is an incredibly tedious and risky procedure. It's also extremely painful to the patient and can result in their death. This should only be used as a last resort or when none of your herbs will work. This is usually used for moving something from inside the cat's body, relocating organs, or fixing ruptured organs.

1. Take large amounts of Bramble Twigs and Thyme and crush them into a syrup. Make the cat eat it and wait until they become unconcious.

2. Use a sharp rock or your sharpest/longest claw (though a rock is preferred) and make the incision where it's needed.

3. Use clean moss to move the edges of the skin if needed. DO NOT use your paws while inside the cat.

4. Use sanitary leaves to perform what you need inside the cat; using anything else can cause infection and even more damage than there already is. 

5. After you're done, you'll need a helper (perferably a medicine cat apprentice). Have them bring the two sides of skin together and then lay a flat, warm, clean rock onto it. (If the stitching is on the stomach, then hold the rock there instead)

6. Use a sharp, cleaned, and sun-dried stick and attach a long line of leaf-string to it. Use the string to weave the two sides of skin back together again. (This step should only be done if the incison was very large and cannot heal with only herbs)

7. Apply Oak Leaf or Echinacea to the area and then continue dabbing moss on it every few hours.

8. Before the cat fully wakes up, give them a small dose of Poppy Seeds and a decent amount of Thyme.

9. Once they're fully awake, give them Shock Root and maybe some Chamomile. Wrap the stitched area in Cobwebs with Goosegrass woven into it.

10. For the next few moons, change the Cobweb-Goosegrass covering regularly. Make sure they're always hydrated and their meals are nutritious and slightly fatty. Do not let them perform warrior/apprentice duties until the cut has fully healed or scabbed over.

Swimming

Swimming can be used to help a cats' muscles get stronger and also keep ill cats moving and awake. However, this should only be used if the said cat has enough energy and strength to do so. If the cat is not a good swimmer or is very young, put them in shallow water for their own safety. 

Wailing/Yowling

Normally, when a cat wails or yowls, it means they're in pain. However, this can also be used to keep a cats' lungs clear of mucus. This can especially be used during New-Leaf when allergies are prominent, or during Leaf-Bare when it gets really cold.

Watercolor-leaves-2

Sources

Most of the information on this page comes from "A Medicinal Guide: Herbs and Remedies" made by RisenxSun and "The Ultimate Guide to Natural Treatments" made by RyeTheCat. I just combined information either page didn't have together and added in some information of my own.